College Freshman

This is likely to be a stressful day, so the calmer and more patient you can be, the better for all.
To me, however, from the next generation, it seemed so sad that how appearances and their struggles with authority plagued them so much. Their high school years just seemed to be extended into their college years.
College life can be stressful and busy but follow these 5 essential tips and you'll be on your way to earning an A+ in your skinny jeans in no time.
It's that time of the year again where all the once "cool kids" of high school who once were witty, arrogant, over-achievers and class clowns who are now shaking in their boots as they start a new chapter as college freshman.
When I woke up on the first morning after delivering you to college it was quiet. Really quiet. Just as I thought, nobody was in your bed. I knew you weren't at a sleepover. Or on a school trip. This was for real.
Summer is sputtering to a close. It's almost September and all across the country, the nest is emptying once again for another set of parents. It's been years since our youngest child has left for college, but I remember that time well. It was a year of painful adjustment.
If you're about to start your freshman year of college, you're likely having a lot of mixed feelings. The best way to channel your excitement and calm your anxiety is to go into college with a plan that will help you be successful in your academic studies, professional dreams, and personal life.
As a soon-to-be 2nd year college student at UC Santa Cruz in my last week before finals, I have been reflecting on the small things I've learned over the past three quarters about navigating a huge university, managing time, prioritizing homework, classes, and friends, and utilizing the vast variety of resources available to students on college campuses.
I just recently finished my first year at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. While I hate using cliché metaphors, I would be neglecting their typical accuracy by not comparing my first year of college to that of a roller coaster ride. There were many ups and downs, but overall I thoroughly enjoyed my first year of school.
Do we stop being parents just because our children no longer live under our roof? I'm over 50 and my parents still see me as their child, but do they still really think of themselves as my parent in the true sense of the word?