college kids

All that aside, you're totes on-fleek.   I heard there's an officially sanctioned "Mom's Weekend" coming up in a few months
In just a few short days, my first-born will graduate from college, a self-confident 22 year old with big dreams and a dazzling
What is wrong with me? Most people are changing bedrooms into man caves or celebrating the fact that they were able to raise a human from a baby into adulthood without harming them or losing them for an extended period of time. All I think about is the empty chair at dinner and the gaps in my duckling lineup.
While your child may come home sometimes, their room is more or less uninhabited throughout the year. So why not transform it into something new?
A steady stream of articles and blog posts bristle with indignation over dads who phone the dean about a trivial problem or moms who are too involved with junior's love life. But how common are such incidents, really? And how damaging are the effects of helicopter parenting (HP) when it does occur?
With only weeks until my firstborn child leaves for college, I struggled late into the night, taking notes on all the ground I wanted to cover before he left.
Thanksgiving, Christmas, Spring, and Summer break are when many parents of college age offspring, look forward to their student coming home with hope, excitement and a little trepidation. You hope you don't say too much, ask too much, or commit the worse crime of all, give unsolicited advice.
College is a magical place where slap the bag is your favorite game, laundry ain't no thang and you have money for absolutely
It's easy to lose perspective in the day-to-day chores and moments of parenting that what you are really doing isn't so much about childhood, or even about high school or college. What you are doing is getting someone ready to be an adult -- and to live a life that is theirs, not yours.
Going off to college is one of the rites of adulthood. The cost of higher education is monumental, but worth it. I always teach that the world around us is a classroom. Your kids will be getting their formal education, but they will also be learning real-life lessons that will last a lifetime.
Embrace the little moments of your children being home this holiday week. Don't fret at the 100 pounds of laundry they lugged home because they didn't do it all semester. (Now I know why my daughter kept saying she had nothing to wear.)
My family has rules, your family has rules, and the one thing I think we can be fairly certain of, no matter what those rules are, is that our kids are not obeying them while they are away at college.
While I trust you will be absolutely fine in your college dorm room these next few days with Hurricane Sandy heading toward shore, I cannot help but worry. You may be 22 years old, but my instinct to protect you and your sister will remain undiminished throughout my life.
As parents, we can stop worrying about the transition to college and plan the visit. If you live close enough to your college age child and do not want to wait until Thanksgiving to see them, well, it's time for a little journey.
Friends told me how great it was when their kids had left home and how much they actually enjoyed their empty nests. They assured me that I would feel enormous pride watching them become independent adults. I'm not there yet, but I've started a list to find that silver lining.
I stared at the mess cargo while standing in my driveway before we left home, and it hit me how that tightly packed, carefully chosen, absolute catastrophe in the back of my SUV and his compact car somewhat resembled my work-in-progress.
At HooplaHa.com we love to see kids who take initiative, and use their natural creativity, energy and enthusiasm to make things happen! College Creamery fits the bill.
Here are a few tips to help you adjust if you are sending your child off to college for the first time.
We get so caught up with our own lives -- the grades, the personal battles -- that we we oftentimes neglect our day-to-day gestures, forgetting to hold the door for a stranger or to ask a professor about his day. Is this really the culture we represent?