college presidents

America's Deaf community is 30 million strong. We need more of them leading, especially in the workplace.
This is a time of year when colleges lure alumni and parents back for homecoming and family weekends. In the midst of so
Mr. Seltzer noted that the most recent American College President Study by the American Council on Education found that about
Rogers found that "you have to be engaged for the long term," not simply show up. The field of democratic engagement and conflict resolution has crucial insights, like finding common interests and the craft of negotiation.
I chronicled a number of obstacles to experienced presidential leadership, asserting that: Perhaps that's what's best about
America is in great need of leaders who rise above everyday routines and bitter controversies to become stewards of democracy. I have come to believe presidents, among others, can take on this role.
Much of what Donald Trump says is the antithesis of everything we stand for as institutions.
Most have nothing to say about the man being nominated for president in their city.
As a college president - and a college parent - I have a dual familiarity with the college search and admissions process
It's one thing for a board to hire a president who can incite necessary change; it's quite another to pour gasoline all over the house.
"You just have to drown the bunnies ... put a Glock to their heads," the school's leader apparently told professors.
All faculty and support staff need a basic frame of reference on access and equity issues. They must be able to engage students in meaningful ways to respect differences and promote a variety of opinions. College, after all, is about learning to respect and value yourself while learning and working with people whose views you may not hold, but whose collaboration you need.
A university president should have the advantage of reflecting knowledge, viewpoints and research grounded in long-term scientific investigation, vetted by institutional experts and carefully readied for distribution without the daily pressures of political leverage or media deadlines.
College presidents spend the majority of their time asking on behalf of their institutions. Requests for alumni donations, research funding, parental support, student involvement or staff compliance are made in an effort to preserve and expand on the college's (real or imagined) greatness.
I don't really care one way or the other whether Princeton erases Woodrow Wilson from its history - except to the extent that such an action would inevitably invite an endless array of similar claims that would both fundamentally distort the realities of our history and distract attention from the real issues of deeply-rooted injustice in our contemporary society that we need to take seriously today.
We are being terrorized -- but not by the shooters. Instead, it's the gun lobby and the cowardly politicians throughout our country. Politicians at the state and federal level don't have the courage to step up and stand up for our children, our friends and our neighbors. It's time for us to stop looking to them for direction.
Lynn Pasquerella is the President of Mount Holyoke College, the first institution in the U.S. to grant women college degrees. President Pasquerella is a 1980 Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude graduate of Mount Holyoke College and earned her Ph.D. in Philosophy in 1985 from Brown University.
The chancellor was caught using private email accounts to avoid public scrutiny of their communications on university business.