college professors

GET EXPERIENTIAL: Theory is a fine thing to know, but students will really "get it" if they can put that theory into practice
I had rarely come across a professor who not only commended my work, but also told me that it meant something, and was worth pursuing. I'd had professors tell me that I was a good writer, but he did more.
They're not widely used by professors or widely demanded by students.
Looking at the big picture, in the twenty-first century education may be as vital to national defense as military defense. If that is the case, then free college education should not be a question but an answer. The only real question is: do we have the courage and will to implement it? If we do, it's possible now.
There she is, sitting in her office surrounded by books and maybe a wilting plant. The Lonely Professor. Piles of papers on her desk and no one comes to see her. She has her lonely apple for lunch. She thinks about the students she sees in her classes and wonders what they are doing now.
I had dreamed of being a writer since I was in second grade, but it wasn't until I took my first class with Kristin Lauer at Fordham University's Lincoln Center campus that I fell in love with writing itself.
Teaching isn't combat or coaching, especially teaching creative writing. We're not in the classroom to humiliate and harden our students as if they're going into the cutthroat world of business or getting ready for the next football game against a team with no losses. Our role should be to help them grow as writers by identifying what they do best and where they need to do more work.
Leadership is about both ideas and implementation. Thinking and doing depend on distinct skill sets. Integrating them is the challenge.
Today is International Women's Day and I have to pay tribute to the amazing woman who changed my life, setting me on the road to success as a writer.
Several professors at the University of Alabama recently experienced a range of emotions while reading student reviews about