college-rape-culture

In many ways, my situation was considerably tamer. Tamer than Steubenville or Stanford; tamer than what a lot of my friends had already gone through. It was one of the reasons why I downplayed it when it happened.
Sexual violence is an issue that every community member must feel responsible for -- not just those who enjoy the privilege of higher education. With Title IX as a mechanism to achieve our goals, high school is the next best place to start protecting young survivors.
While some people argue that grinding is simply "all in good fun," even the definition of the word grind, "to oppress," leaves me wondering if other women are having a hard time having fun in this culture of no consent.
Lady Gaga and Vice President Joe Biden, you gave me hope at the Oscars. Thank you. When I turned off the television, I felt real hope that we really can reduce sexual assault and violence on campuses and in our communities.
I am reminded I am a woman when I have to decide whether or not to leave my hair down and potentially be harassed for it, or stuff it under a hat. Not that it matters; I'll get harassed anyway, but if my hair is up, it gives me the chance to find another part of my body to blame.
Upon reporting this to campus police, I was told that this group is actually a secret society of frat boys and students that routinely wanders around in this costume and operates under the name "Coffin and Keys."
The link is easy to see. A sign promising to objectify women leads to actions objectifying women. A culture of objectification leads to an unsafe environment for those women. Today's "Welcome to Campus" sign scandal is tomorrow's rape scandal.
Sexual violence can have such serious and lasting repercussions for survivors and bystanders alike that even one sexual assault is still too many.
As a faculty survivor activist in the new campus anti-rape movement, it is unsettling to witness the "appalling silence of the good people," especially those who hold the greatest power to address the crisis: faculty members.
I am heartbroken and angry to see our national leaders act defensive as a means of self-preservation. They fail to realize that Greeks are survivors, Greeks are advocates and Greeks value their community. To lift up our organizations, we must stop being defensive.
Take Back The Night invites you to speak, to add your story to the heap. We invite those who stand against sexual violence to Walk the Walk with us, to do more than just talk the talk.
Sorry alumni. But it's a different world than the one you knew, and it's not pretty.
Some people commenting on the alleged rape at the University of Virginia are angry at "Jackie" for either making up the story or, if the story is true, not reporting it. Why wouldn't Jackie, or any victim of sexual assault, go to the police? They must be cowards. Shame on them.
He had not responded to a request for additional comment at the time of publication. Yet, critics at Gawker and Jezebel have
You would put your hand on my belly to feel the baby kicking. You loved the new life that was stirring inside of me. Sometimes I would let you rub an ice cube on my belly to awaken your brother, and we would laugh when we saw a tiny foot or elbow move across my stretched skin.
I'm not talking about teaching boys to hold doors open for girls. I'm talking about parents taking the lead in actively teaching our children to value human dignity and human empathy -- in both sexes.
Higher education groups have shown a resistance to implementing the surveys, though the idea of conducting them is widely
I wondered if we would have laughed if I had been with a man the night before, instead of a woman. I wondered if, limping into the coffee shop, my friend's response would have been awe and respect had I told her of a man who grabbed me too roughly, who ripped my shirt, who left me aching to leave and unsure of how to go.
Susan J. Brison, chair of the Philosophy Department at Dartmouth, discussed her own rape during a panel, and attacked schools
Cat Del Buono's satirical comprehensive guide on "how to not get raped" is inspired by WikiHow, Cosmopolitan Magazine, the