college readiness

Higher education is the cornerstone upon which America's successful participation in the competitive global economy rests
Wouldn’t it be great if both candidates picked up this baton?
Last week, I dropped my youngest daughter off to college and still felt that familiar pang in my heart.  The year before
While we've been away this summer, the School Superintendent's Association (AASA) has released a series of National College
The most powerful influence on a teenager is another teenager. Our shared experiences give us perspective and help us believe in ourselves and overcome any obstacles.
Throw out the image of high school for a second and imagine instead your child were going backpacking in the Himalayas. Would you let them coast until the trip? Or would you insist they've got to break in those hiking boots?
Powerful summers: Remember colleges expect students to be as productive as possible during their summers. They can use summers
Teens face a variety of complex issues with the transition from childhood to adulthood. When these issues are compounded by perceived scarcity, whether in the form of poverty, abuse or lack of a nurturing support system, it can be even more challenging for teens to generate or maintain their self-esteem and find their way forward.
I graduated from a large urban school system and currently teach in a similar one where, as an Advanced Placement (AP) teacher, I have a unique vantage point from which to gauge the skills needed for college and career preparedness.
Should Adam choose to pursue a STEM career, his leadership skill-building experiences will help give him the competitive edge that will put his resume at the top of the pile. In the meantime, we can't wait to see him back at Camp Invention next summer!
"Proficient" is having a moment right now in the education world, so perhaps this is an opportune moment to stop and reflect, to sit and think about how the term, like "all natural" and "college and career ready," doesn't actually mean a thing.
Diane Ravitch, in her recent post about international math tests, raises concerns that standardized tests damage the quality of education and constrain young people's intellectual growth. What I worry about is the way they can unfairly deny opportunities to students.
Those behind a recent survey about high education were interested in whether high school graduates felt they were ready for college. In my opinion, there are ways to fill those perceived "gaps" upon entering college, and many of them have absolutely nothing to do with grades.
Are adults - educators, no less - really that oblivious to what goes on in the mind of a 7-year-old? And do they really want to lard even more hype on to the college admissions process? Apparently so.
Another student, Vanessa, said, "The ODU sessions were truly inspiring. The lectures on sleep made me want to change my sleeping
The NCLB focus on literacy has had the perhaps unintended consequence of emphasizing reading and writing fiction or autobiographical material.