college tuition hikes

The student debt crisis is only a crisis because gullible parents are supporting spoilt brats, and allowing them to believe they are the chosen ones, when in fact, they are not.
When my daughter was accepted as one of the 1,700 students among 32,000 who applied to attend Duke University, my husband
Millennials have been flocking to Clinton's campaign since she began discussing her ideas of how to make education more affordable. With so many appealing ideas, it is no wonder she is grabbing the attention of the younger generation.
Is administrative bloat real? And to what extent is growth in administrative salary lines responsible for the increased cost of higher education?
Millennials may be spending more for college and racking up record debt, but they don't mind, according to a new survey of 500 university graduates by Credit Sesame.
To complain about high college tuition is both relevant and popular. College tuition has risen faster than inflation for a generation. For many students and their families, the rise in tuition rates may put access to quality higher education in jeopardy.
The college tuition system is the most socialized sector within our capitalized economy; this is why it's completely disconnected from rational market forces and makes no logical sense. So, if you're wondering why college costs are out of control, ask Karl Marx why idealism has yet to trump reality.
For many years, athletics relied heavily on their schools to fund sports. But today, thanks primarily to television, sports have become massive revenue generators. At the same time, public universities have seen their funding plummet. It's time to flip the script; one hand helps the other.
If there was ever a reason to defrock politicians, it is for their inherent inability to remove the needless barrier of debt that impedes the best and the brightest, the most ambitious and creative among the lesser financially endowed.
On Thursday night CNN will air Ivory Tower, a documentary that explores the value of a college education.
A single question is raised when these factors culminate: Where exactly does the money for college tuition go to? Surely the dean's dog can't stomach $60,000 per student.
Until we address the root cause of the problem, students will continue to graduate with big debts that not only burden them, but create a drag on the economy as a whole.
In my own personal experience as a middle class student in the top 1 percent of my class, I've had to reconsider my college choices due to finances.
Is college tuition going up to compensate for state cuts? Or do plentiful student loans encourage states to cut aid and colleges to raise tuitions?
Michigan State trustees are unpaid, and they're expected to represent the Spartans at alumni dinners, receptions and events
Colleges and universities have long been concerned with the issues of controlling cost and providing the neediest students with access to a good education, and we welcome President Obama's interest in providing solutions.
There is not enough space today to enter into the debate about whether federal financial aid has been the primary driver of rising tuition.
Although professors sport a negligible ability to directly lower a tuition bill, I would argue that there are other things that faculty can do to address the cost of higher education, practices that can directly affect the experiences and outcomes of our struggling students.