college value

A new website shows debt levels and annual earnings for former students of colleges that accept federal student aid.
Practical wisdom is the moral and intellectual wherewithal to live well, to prosper and thrive oneself, and, in so doing, to contribute to the prosperity and well-being of others. In this sense, a Wooster education is the most practical education possible in and for the world today.
These reflections are those of a parent, not an educator, but they reinforce my professional conviction about the distinctive and powerful impact of residential liberal arts colleges.
When considering how we make higher education "worth it," perhaps we should stop periodically to remind ourselves that students are not simply numbers or completions.
Return on investment is more important to students and families when it comes to deciding what college to attend for an undergraduate degree than it has been in many years.
Hating on universities and the uselessness of their degrees is trendy. A quick Google search will offer you hundreds of rants detailing the pointlessness of secondary education. Yet while college has become a bad investment, it's likely not for the reasons you have in mind.
We think about the value of going to college but the actual value is in being a graduate from college -- being an alumnus.
Not only is a liberal arts education not as expensive as news stories lead us to believe, but there may be no better investment in America today.
Full Segment: A new report says nearly half of the nation’s recent college graduates work jobs that don’t require a degree, a stark contradiction to Obama's education platform.
In 2010, 39.3 percent of adults between the ages of 25 and 34 had a post-secondary degree, up from 38.8 percent in 2009. While
I do believe that connections are what an elite private college education is all about -- but it's more than social networking.
Are students being saddled with debt at the worst possible time? Can students with a liberal arts education compete in an economy that demands technical skills? And most pointedly: What are students getting for their money?
Today's traditional liberal arts colleges and universities are facing a dilemma: stick with the "learning for the sake of learning" model, or integrate career preparation elements into their curricula.
It is true that young people today are light years ahead of past generations in mastering new technologies and adopting innovation. But nothing changes the fact that a 21st century economy requires a 21st century education.
The odious phrase "the real world" assumes that the university is unlike the world of blue and white collars. But the private and public sectors are not replete with multiple choice exams.
We all want students to get great jobs and lead happy lives. But pretending that a piece of paper is all that's needed to do this is something we can no longer do. We need to stop telling students they've got to have a degree and instead tell them they've got to learn.
In business, we often ask, "What is the value proposition?" Or, as the old commercial goes, Where's the beef? This is in
In this era of "experts" younger than certain dresses of mine in areas such as social media, is a higher degree really necessary? Or do you need only a savant-like grasp on tech economy to ensure a prosperous life?