colonoscopies

(Reuters Health) - Two years after offering colonoscopy patients full coverage for their screening if they had it done at
I did it! The "Dreaded Colonoscopy." Only it wasn't so dreaded. It was easy. Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy. (Literally "lemon squeezy.")
In December of 2014, I went into the hospital for my final surgery. When I woke up, my colostomy bag was gone, and I was on the road to recovery. It's funny -- the little things. The little things sometimes teach us the biggest lessons in life.
I'll skip the pre-game antics. Much has been written about them. My experiences were neither amusing nor edifying. Just expect The Elixir from Hell, followed by a deluge rivaling all natural catastrophes, specifically mudslides and monsoons.
At Jay's wake, Katie approached me and several other physicians and pleaded with us to do something about colon cancer. She didn't want other families to suffer the loss hers had endured. We explained to Katie that we thought she could do more than we could to fight this disease.
LGBT people have lower colorectal cancer screening rates, especially transgender people and people of color. All our usual barriers to care (stigma, lack of health insurance, etc.) make it difficult. In the interest of getting more of us to do this, why don't you follow me through the process?
More than 50,000 Americans are expected to die from colorectal cancer this year alone. We need to reduce that number by seeing that everyone who should be screened for colorectal cancer gets screened.
"Colorectal cancer screening saves lives,” said study author Jim Stimpson, director of the Center for Health Policy at the
T-minus 48 hours until I start drinking 48 ounces of liquid laxative. Twice. And so "colonoscopy-prep math" begins.
Knudsen said she hoped the study "will provide more information to patients and their doctors about the options available