Columbia Journalism Review

Who could possibly argue about the news value of catching a Congressman on video slipping out the back door early with a
The American Press Institute, who support a vibrant and democratic free press, recently released some really good work on the ethics of funding of nonprofit journalism, with specific recommendations to come.
Too many reporters have a conveyor belt mentality, blithely writing copy based on press releases without doing any real reporting or even basic fact checking. And sometimes, their stories blow up spectacularly when their investigative laziness is revealed.
Proft has partnered with Brian Timpone, the former CEO of troubled local news service provider, Journatic, LLC, to produce
It’s been a standout year for journalism—and a disappointing one. CJR discussed the most important media stories and trends
CJR's chief talks about its digital shift and new membership model.
In an effort to better align our resources with our mission, we have decided to significantly boost our investment inColumbia
In an online Denver Post op-ed, I urged reporters to seek out and interview hiding politicians. I gave some recent examples, like Rep. Mike Coffman hiding from reporters after he said he isn't sure Obama is an American. On Twitter, former CU regent Tom Lucero, a Republican, told me I left out instances of Democrats hiding from reporters.
One of the most fascinating aspects of the Serial podcast craze has been the amount of audience interaction with the story
In his editor’s letter this week announcing a redesigned New York Times Magazine, one with much more digital content and
It's hard to trust the news overall when many major stories are ignored by news outlets. It's hard to trust the news when the press does so little fact-checking.
Neither public servants nor clergy nor holy books nor heroes are infallible. Battling obscurantism does not mean we are saints of any kind. It means we will not accept a tyrant's bogus paradise, and are free to form our own words and images and make up our own minds.
Do your best to get it right. If you do, great. If you don't, admit you got it wrong, fix it, even if hard, and try harder next time. And we should reward journalists and press outlets that are practicing good, honest journalism.
If you're going to make an audacious bet on the future of newspapers, as Aaron Kushner did with the Orange County Register, then it stands to reason that you should have enough money in the bank to be able to wait and see how it plays out.
Both Kohn and Ferguson said that they felt conservatives outnumber liberals on Fox News, and vice versa on MSNBC. What's
Has Orange County Register owner Aaron Kushner run into nothing more than a bit of turbulence from which he can recover?