common core standards

Our public schools are more segregated today than they were 40 years ago when integration was an explicit policy goal. The
A recent editorial suggested that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been characterized by hubris. It has hedged big bets, hoping its efforts would succeed. It's also suffered failure and for that it's been criticized as having exercised too much influence over education policy.
Like Weber, we are "sick and tired" of this debate. We too are tired of having our work cynically dismissed as a product
Did a relationship ever sour so quickly as the Common Core and public opinion? Back in 2010 when the college- and career
Regardless of sector, race, or age, we all want the same things for our families and ourselves: as my mother says, "health, happiness, safety, the strength to cope with anything that comes our way." Here are six practices that help me get a little closer to whole heart health.
By now everyone who cares about National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) results might be sick of thinking about them, in part because the 2015 results from what is often called the nation's report card were -- let's face it -- depressing.
As the 2016 presidential race revs up, we can expect that the Common Core standards will remain the boogeyman of U.S. education. A mere mention of their name is enough to inspire terror.
There is the question of whether the Common Core curriculum will result in students working on material that is merely more difficult (and more frequently tested) rather than spending time on content that actually interests them.
As the coach of one of the country's largest middle school speech and debate teams, I come across various moments that one should define as "unethical," but that somehow continue to occur in many competitive events.
The Education Commission report says that a few states give clear guidance on opting out: In California and Utah, state law
As a college student, I know firsthand that any form of standardized testing is an inaccurate form of measuring one's performance in a higher-education setting, because the learning style and environment is so drastically different from that of any K-12 institution.
"What started out as an innovative idea to create a set of base-line standards that could be ‘voluntarily’ used by the states
If the theory of action behind NCLB is that better education will lead to less disparity, the data suggest this theory is dead wrong.
This week's White House "College Opportunity" summit will focus on an overlooked area with enormous potential for student success: K-12 and higher education working together to improve college completion. It sounds so simple and obvious. In fact many assume it's already happening.
Now, if that were the end of the story, it would be a good story - for them. But it is not, and therefore it is not. The
Know who wins in the absence of empirical evidence to support a standards-to-promised-CCSS-results connection given that the nation is now in the middle of the CCSS mud?
OK, here is a math word problem for you: How many different ways can you arrange five keys on a circular ring?
They help educators all over the country focus on what students need to learn rather than getting distracted by dozens of
Having written curricula and lesson plans geared to the high school level Common Core Standards, I just don't see what all the hub bub's about.