common core standards

Six years after the release of our first national standards, the Common Core, and the new federal tests that accompanied
A recent editorial suggested that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been characterized by hubris. It has hedged big bets, hoping its efforts would succeed. It's also suffered failure and for that it's been criticized as having exercised too much influence over education policy.
  That seems to be the tack taken by education bloggers Mark Weber and Alan Singer, who were both frothing recently about
Then, implementation happened. Many teachers felt rushed to produce results. Parents couldn't understand their child's homework
Regardless of sector, race, or age, we all want the same things for our families and ourselves: as my mother says, "health, happiness, safety, the strength to cope with anything that comes our way." Here are six practices that help me get a little closer to whole heart health.
By now everyone who cares about National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) results might be sick of thinking about them, in part because the 2015 results from what is often called the nation's report card were -- let's face it -- depressing.
As the 2016 presidential race revs up, we can expect that the Common Core standards will remain the boogeyman of U.S. education. A mere mention of their name is enough to inspire terror.
There is the question of whether the Common Core curriculum will result in students working on material that is merely more difficult (and more frequently tested) rather than spending time on content that actually interests them.
As the coach of one of the country's largest middle school speech and debate teams, I come across various moments that one should define as "unethical," but that somehow continue to occur in many competitive events.
In New Mexico this past week, over 2,000 students from Albuquerque Public Schools opted not to participate in standardized