community banks

Now that I have your attention, we can talk about the financial service needs of the working poor comprised of the financially disenfranchised, immigrants and lower tier of the middle class and which type of banking institution is positioned to best meet their needs.
The handful of Wall Street's sprawling too-big-to-fail "banks" pose a unique, dangerous threat to America's families, workers, financial system and economy, which their "hide and disguise" strategy tries to conceal.
Financial institutions across the U.S. this week celebrated small businesses in a big way -- offering grants from $10,000 to $100,000, holding seminars, and touting their service and commitment to those firms considered to be the backbone of the U.S. economy.
Wall Street and its allies are once again pretending to care about community banks while trying to roll back financial reform to help, you guessed it, Wall Street. But, don't be fooled by industry's spin on this so-called "study."
Senator Elizabeth Warren's Q&A at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on February 12, 2015 titled, "“Regulatory Relief for Community Banks and Credit Unions.”
Other community banks in the ranking with more traditional product lines take a hands-on, efficiency-focused approach to
Comparing the investment benefits derived from buying scattered single family homes and condominium units, versus multifamily rental properties is a no brainier.
Studies show locally owned businesses are a primary source of net new job creation. Yet independent businesses in many sectors are losing market share, while the number of new startups has steadily fallen over the last two decades.  Insufficient capital is a key culprit driving these trends.
This is a blog series produced in partnership with One World, a video series with Deepak Chopra and NEWSWIRE.FM.  To view
Goldman is spending handsomely to promote its small business friendly image. But when it comes to actually helping small business, Goldman is far more miserly.
Community and smaller-to-mid-sized regional banks serve a variety of interests. They tend to favor the needs of local and mid-sized businesses or specific socio-economic communities who want a more personalized approach to banking.
Both big and small banks provide the same essential services of holding your money and allowing you to incur interest through various savings accounts; however, in other areas, some of the differences are stark.
Five years after the failure of Lehman Brothers, the mega banks have rebounded, community banks that serve vulnerable niches of American consumers, and which played no role in causing the Financial Crisis, are failing, and non-traditional lenders are expanding.
We should applaud the new resolve of the CFPB, other federal agencies and state legislatures to thwart these abusive practices. But we cannot become complacent.
The regulatory framework for financial institutions in the United States, including many provisions of Dodd-Frank, impose significant costs on community banks without providing benefits to consumers or the economy that justify those costs.
American branch banking needs a renewed and relevant future. Traditional financial literacy needs a renewed and relevant future. Think of an innovative solution which re-imagines each. Imagine returning the word 'community' back into the storyline of American banking.
Breiter also says people have called to ask how they too can recreate Gammesfeld in their own village, although he says that