Compulsory voting

Australia always has a massive voter turnout, which has been credited for its relatively moderate candidates.
The arguments for compulsory voting compare it to a civic duty not unlike taxation, compulsory education (for the good of the society), jury duty and military service.
The class bias in turnout affects the economic liberalism of the state legislature. Specifically, when class bias is low, the liberal opinions of the public translate into liberal policy. But when class bias is high, liberal public opinion has no effect on policy.
No more registering when we should not have to, no more collecting our taxes without each taxpayer having a say in how they are spent. (And yes, you could still write in your own gag candidate of choice, be it Grumpy Cat, Homer Simpson or Lyndon Larouche.)
Under a non-compulsory voting system with fewer people voting, smaller lobby groups can easily sway a small section of the people to the polls and thereby manipulate the outcome of the political process.
At a time when we should be talking about community outreach and education, turning the act of voting into an action of rote only serves to cheapen the institution and does nothing to solve its problems.
RIDGWAY -- Residents of this Old West- meets-New Age town can be fined if their fences are too high, they have too many chickens