con artists

Experts weigh in on what makes us interested in fraudsters like Billy McFarland and Elizabeth Holmes.
The goal was to separate people from their money.
Will Smith carries this film on shoulders. His cool demeanor and devil-may-care attitude are appealing. He has tremendous stage presence, and he knows how to work the camera.
These are just a few examples of how and when you might be deceived. I haven't mentioned romantic scams, dark patterns or
n the past year, Americans have lost over $18 billion to fraud, identity theft and various scams. But how? We all know when something seems too good to be true, it probably is. So, why do people continue to fall for scams or fail to protect their personal data?
This story can be spun in dozens of ways. But one thing clearly emerges for me: Humans are vulnerable; we create our reality indirectly, using words and images, building on dreams. By our nature, our language permits the twinned characteristics of fiction and deception.
I understand why Lance Armstrong felt he needed to dope. I don't understand why he needed to lie (and tweet) with such conviction that I believed in him. I understand why Manti Te'o needed to build a great "brand." I don't understand why he needed a fake social media girlfriend to do it.
At first, Walmart didn't believe the family's story, but finally refunded the money and gave Akers an iPad for free. Akers
Barack Obama may have major star endorsements such as Bruce Springsteen, Jay-Z, Beyonce and Ben Affleck -- but Mitt Romney has just landed a major endorsement that dwarfs those!2012-10-31-ScreenShot20121031at3.02.08PM.png
Our shows document the stories of fraudsters at large, on the run, who have evaded the authorities. There is a reward offered for information leading to their arrest and conviction. Hopefully, we will be able to apprehend one of them as the result of exposing them.
The con that ensnared me was a mundane one, which made it all the more undetectable. It wasn't an ungrammatical email promising fantastic riches, but a perfectly ordinary financial transaction with two very nice people.
America has always admired a good confidence artist, that sleek and clever shyster whose fancy words promise a golden future. He is a direct descendent of mythic anti-heroes like cowboys or noir detectives, who exploit the ragged edges of the modern world.
wo of the best shows on cable return this week. They are White Collar and Royal Pains. Both shows have built a loyal fan base over the years, and each show has shown improvement year after year.
Baby boomers are still looking out for their parents, even as they have fallen into the crosshairs of financial con artists
No other demographic falls victim to scams and fraud quite as much as Post50s. Older adults are more likely than their younger
A man who claimed to be a private investigator looking into a scam that bilked an 86-year-old Tinley Park woman out of $8,000
The same people who paid for the midterm election ads playing on middle class economic insecurity are the people who made the middle class insecure in the first place. This will become cruelly obvious with the new Congress.
From the snake-oil salesmen of the Old West to the grifters of the early 20th century, Rhonda Byrne of The Secret is the latest in a long history of American shakedown artists.
Anthony T. Lackman, Jeremy L. Albertson, Tyler M. Smith, Henry S. Siegman and Justin C. Davidson are charged with theft by