congressional-asian-pacific-american-caucus

A bipartisan group of senators came to an agreement. But the White House and other senators haven't said yes yet.
A Senator also pointed out Asians may not apply for DACA due to Japanese-American prison camp history.
Immigration is about families. Immigration is about building a stronger community, society, and economy. The momentum is building, and we can no longer afford not to act.
If some lawmakers have their way, immigrants, under immigration reform, would no longer be able to sponsor their siblings, just their spouses and children.
This week, we broke all the records. We now have the first Asian American and Pacific Islander majority district in the continental United States, which I've been elected to serve in Congress as the representative of California's 17th District.
This is a momentous week for immigration reform advocates in Congress. As a nation we are taking a step forward in a collective fight for immigration reform that respects the dignity of immigrant communities and recognizes their contributions to making our country great.
The Obama administration recently announced that immigration enforcement programs will no longer target DREAM Act-eligible youth and other low-priority immigration offenders.
Today, many for-profit colleges have picked up where the subprime lenders left off. They are using the same promise of the American dream as bait to trap vulnerable students into underperforming schools and saddling them with a lifetime of debt.
For too long, viral hepatitis, an epidemic that doesn't necessarily make headlines, has steadily and silently affected the lives of millions of Americans.
Immigration reform would yield $1.5 trillion to the US GDP over a ten-year period. Every day we wait, our economy loses hundreds of thousands of dollars in tax revenue and consumer spending.
On March 15, 2011, as a Japanese-American Member of Congress and Chairman Emeritus of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, I introduced the following House resolution.
My father proudly served in the Military Intelligence Service. Yet when I was a child, we were confined at an internment camp simply because of our Japanese ancestry. Decades later, something similarly sinister is returning to our country.
The serious and necessary debate on comprehensive immigration reform has been clouded by a debate over birthright citizenship. Some Republican legislators want to redefine how we understand the 14th Amendment.
Immigration brings formidable fiscal implications. Keeping immigrants here or sending them home can save or cost taxpayers dearly.
Today, over 16.2 million Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders from 45 distinct ethnic groups make up one of the fastest growing and most diverse populations in the United States.
I urge my colleagues to stand against this reckless repeal of critical health care reform and vote against the Patients' Rights Repeal Act.
Admiring Dr. King's life is not enough; we must live his legacy as well. Let us honor his life by working together to continue to build an America where every child can safely and securely enjoy the privileges of equal opportunity and freedom.
Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have the highest rate of business ownership among all minorities, and their businesses account for fully half of all minority business employment in the United States.
Under new House rules, residents living in Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa and Northern Marianas, will no longer have a vote on the House Floor in the Committee of the Whole.