congressional pay

"It’s time for Congress to start living in the real world -- where you either do your job -- or you don't get paid."
Hastings sees a similar problem. "Now where we are headed, is to becoming an elite institution. And I predict 20 years out
Americans do not think Congress is underpaid, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll conducted after outgoing member of
Shut down the government? They still collect their paychecks. Waste time voting on a Supreme Court upheld law? Doesn't matter, they can waste all the time they want and still get paid. If only the rest of us had such cushy jobs that rewarded us for not doing a damn thing.
Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) thinks members of Congress aren't paid enough. Speaking to CQ Roll Call, Moran, who is retiring after this term, said he and his colleagues are not adequately compensated for their public service.
Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) thinks members of Congress aren't paid enough. "You won't get a lot of votes," Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla
Source: CongressStillGetsPaid.com According to Congress Still Gets Paid, which has been tracking congressional earnings since
“Like most people, my frustration has grown by the day over the last month, with the government shutdown and the brinkmanship
While over 150 lawmakers have said they would either refuse or donate their compensation until the shutdown is over, some
One CourageCampaign petition hosted on MoveOn.org has received around 350,000 signatures. Hundred of thousands more people
Rep. Lee Terry (R-Neb.) said this week that there is no way he's giving up his salary during the government shutdown.
"Dang straight," he said when asked by the Omaha World-Herald Bureau whether he would keep his paycheck. About 800,000 public
On Tuesday, Rep. Rick Nolan (D-Minn.) introduced the "No Government — No Pay Act," which would stop members from being paid
The "No Government – No Pay Act" would stop members from being paid their salaries for as long as a shutdown continues. While
This cruel irony isn't lost on the federal workers who stand to lose pay but for an act of Congress, most of whose members
Our workers have suffered mightily in the last few years. The $7.25 minimum wage hasn't been raised since 2009. And thanks to the latest corporate cheap trick, even that paltry sum has been further eroded.
They draw government pensions from previous work in addition to their congressional salary. The practice is called "double
On Wednesday, White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters that President Barack Obama planned to return 5 percent