Success often depends on our ability to present a socially acceptable image. Ideally, our social image aligns with our authentic self or essence.
I realized at that moment that I couldn't hide anymore. In order for me to live my purpose and to impact the lives of my readers I needed to be authentic to who I am. I needed to start telling the truth, if I was ever really going to be able to help those that need me most.
What good is having a lock you can open with your phone, a television with personalized recommendations or a fridge that can tell you when you're out of milk if it doesn't work properly or in harmony?
Take a moment to look around the next time you're in a meeting, at a social event, waiting in line or walking down the street. You'll likely find yourself surrounded by people staring at a smartphone or other digital device. Chances are you'll join them. What's going on here?
The Dalai Lama's ageless advice -- as was Shakespeare's -- is brilliantly simple in today's complex digital age: Be real to yourself to create a real environment online. Read: Be human.
When my daughter tells me that she is more American than I am because she was born here and I wasn't, I respond that I actually think the opposite is true - that because I made the choice to become American, I am more American then she is. I made the choice to leave my past behind and asked to become a U.S. citizen, while she was given citizenship at birth. I never planned to leave my past behind and I didn't have a childhood dream to become American, but yet, I did end up doing this, so, how did I get here?
I remember the late '90s. I was fresh out of the closet, a teenage, single, gay guy who was going out clubbing every weekend. 90% of my friends were single, gay guys and I was frequently on the dating market. That's how I saw most young gays living their lives back in those days. It was not yet legal for two men to get married, and usually same-sex families were out of public sight. Fast-forward 10 years later. I was married to my husband, Ido, we were pregnant with our first daughter, and 90% of our friends were married, straight couples. Our date nights involved staying at home, watching a movie on a 40-inch television screen in our own living room. How did we end up there?? I always wondered when this transition to the good ol' typical American family started.
Over the course of the weekend, I start feeling - not great. I'll just put it out there. I get constipated. I'm feeling weird, like you know how your stomach gets tight, you're walking around full because all that food is on your lungs? Then I decide l can't take it anymore and what does my dumb 22-year-old self do? I give myself an enema.
I did it! I popped the question to my boyfriend. Why, you may ask? I had a really intimate conversation with Tashera Simmons, DMX's ex-wife. Who!? DMX, the rapper. Yes, the rapper.
There is a saying: It takes a village. Well, for our family it is literally a true statement. My husband, Eli, and I have two beautiful daughters. Milo is five years old and Demi is 19 months old. To have them, we needed to go through two surrogacy journeys with the help and support of a wonderful egg donor, two amazing gestational carriers, doctors, nurses, psychologists, social workers, attorneys and our close family, of course. Both Milo and Demi share the same egg donor and have a different biological dad; one girl is biologically Eli's and one is biologically mine.
My husband and I knew we wanted to be parents even before we got married. One problem: we are two men.