Conservative talk radio

Ingraham's idea is a dud all the way around. Not only that, it runs counter to what most Americans want: a solution to our country's broken immigration solution. Ingraham's pledge is remarkable only for being pathetic and pointless.
The right has the right to satirize its adversaries. But on the day these two men were claiming to celebrate American democracy, they made a point of dismissing and ridiculing one of the leading voices for women's advancement, which, it must be noted, is fundamental to the advancement of democracy.
Morton Downey succeeded where earlier talkers like Wally George and Bob Grant failed. He turned conservatism into both a rock concert and professional wrestling theater. Out of this innovative mash-up came the slick, in-your-face production values and jingoism of Fox News Channel.
"I think that right wing talk radio has had enough influence on the management of the GOP that they have helped cripple the
Glenn Beck is building an amusement park called -- what else? -- Independence Park. But he's pitching it to be much more than a roadside tourist trap with a tilt-a-whirl, concessions and skeeball. Beck wants his herd of followers to believe it's a real city -- his own version of Ayn Rand's "Galt's Gulch."
What happened to talk radio in Boston? I would point to three factors. And I would suggest that none of these are unique to our part of the country. Boston may be on the leading edge, but these same trends could sweep away talk elsewhere, too.
In Milwaukee five right-wing talkers on two stations directly supported Republican candidates 15 hours a day, five days a week. But these are public airwaves, not Republican airwaves, so the Media Action Center filed a legal challenge with the FCC to deny WISN and WTMJ their licenses.
It won't surprise you that I blame the media for this reality. What will probably shock you is that I fault the conservative media more than any other entity.
It is with profound satisfaction that I note the impending retirement of Neal Boortz after four decades in radio.
I believe I have found the legal means to put Talk Radio on trial at the FCC -- and perhaps eventually at the Supreme Court. The Wisconsin recall of Governor Scott Walker presented a golden opportunity.
Despite some free speech concerns being raised online, the resolution is expected to pass. The question is whether the measure
It seems the Bible never referred to Mary Magdalene as a prostitute. A Catholic Pope did.
Rush Limbaugh's use of "slut" and "prostitute" was a textbook example of how horrifically damning gender slurs are, and why such forms of abuse deserve swift and serious action.
Limbaugh hit a nerve last week, but Rush-like comments aren't uncommon from radio hosts in Colorado, too. Should the major media ignore them, given the tiny audiences (mostly) who listen?
The flight of advertisers from Limbaugh will be defended by many as the market mechanism through which the public's views are expressed. To me, it's just cowardice.
I've been thinking that journalists should add a "civility" beat to their shrinking offerings. At least they should give a little extra air or ink (literal and digital) to challenge politicians when they hit below the belt.
This morning, Rep. Doug Lamborn told radio host Steve Kelley that he wasn't the only member of Congress to skip President Obama's SOTU speech yesterday, implying, perhaps, that he was being singled out unfairly.
Skip this if you're one of those people who doesn't want to read about the latest outrageous comments on right-wing talk radio, because... they're just the latest outrageous comments on right-wing talk radio.
The Occupy Wall Street movement, like the American people, isn't anti-corporate, it's anti-corporate crime. The real question is: why aren't its critics like Herman Cain against corporate crime?