Consumer debt

While the current amount of debt Americans are facing is staggering, the economy continues to grow at a fairly steady pace.
Between the New Deal and the 1970s, Wall Street was tightly controlled. Taxes on the wealthy were high, worker wages were rising, and debt levels on consumers, companies and government were low. After finance wriggled free from these regulations private and public debt exploded, wages stalled, taxes on the rich fell and inequality soared.
Recent research about student loans and mortgages raises the question of whether having too much debt can make you sick. Survey results are particularly troubling because they suggest that it is the debt itself -- not the burden of repayment.
The welfare state has been dismantled, leaving a much greater number of Americans without a safety net. And the further the public sector retreats from the provision of social services, the more the finance industry steps in to "help us" get what we need to get by.
You want to know how the working poor really live? My husband works an average of 50 hours per week just so we can barely make it paycheck to paycheck. We are the in-betweeners. Not making enough to live "comfortably" -- but not "poor" enough to get any assistance either.
There's never been much question as to whether taking out a payday loan is a sound financial decision. The short-term loans
Overall household delinquency rates dropped to 5.0 percent in the three months to December 31 from 5.3 percent in the third
A consensus seems to be forming that U.S. consumers have cleaned up their balance sheets enough that they're ready to stuff
The credit report inquiries series in Chart 8 (green line) tracks the new account series quite closely. As the twelve-month
The bad news is that those that are carrying debt are carrying more. In 2011, the amount of debt households carried in 2000
It's extremely difficult to change the behaviors that got you into debt. Here are three of the psychological reasons why getting out of debt is so difficult -- and what you can do to combat your wiring.
The book was written anonymously by a "collective of resistors, defaulters, and allies from Strike Debt and Occupy Wall Street
Organizers are buying up consumer debt for pennies on the dollar and instead of collecting on it they are forgiving it. In my opinion the effort is misguided because this strategy can result in those with their debt forgiven, owing the IRS.
While it is doubtful that in the next decade or so we will see debt relief service demand at the levels experienced in 2009-2010, we should see a greater demand in the next three to five years. It will just take time to reload the consumer debt pipeline.
Before the recession of 2008 overturned many long-held financial beliefs, it wasn't uncommon for people to differentiate between "good debt" and "bad debt." Today, it's time to re-examine the concept that, in certain cases, acquiring debt may still make sense.
So much of what you hear about the recent economic trends of people learning grand lessons about avoiding debt are just not true.
This isn't a blender you are thinking of buying here -- this is a service that can have a profoundly negative impact to your life and financial health if you make the wrong choice or select the wrong provider.
"We're going to try to live within our means because living beyond it didn't work out," Jack Ablin, chief investment officer