Consumer price index

Making public colleges and universities free only perpetuates the problem and relieves the pressure to make necessary reforms. It's a facile answer to a complex question.
As a high level organization that manipulates monetary apparatuses, the Fed merely feigns concern about inflation as a theoretical risk.
If America is to shed the title of "Land of Inequality," this is how it is going to happen: by more people becoming aware of how the Fed's monetary policy affects them and demanding that it change.
Thanks to a new infographic from Movehub, a site that provides information to those looking to move abroad, we can see clearly
Good news, consumers: Everything's on sale! The bad news: Low, low prices aren't always such a great thing.
Here is a graphical representation of what that means for parents: There are several striking things on this chart. For one
It's a pity more of those "inflationistas," who cry wolf at the slightest hint of rising prices, haven't visited the FDR Memorial where some of his most telling words are engraved, such as: "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little."
For the first time in decades, young Americans are now questioning whether obtaining more postsecondary education is worth the time and expense.
Every October, the Bureau of Labor Statistics calculates cost-of-living adjustments by comparing price indexes from the third