contagion

At the more complex level, I would argue, it is probable that some of the responsibility rests with Donald Trump or, one might say, with the "spirit" that Trump has unleashed into the world with his campaign.
Please. Disappoint us. There are no lack of virulent organisms floating around any time of the year. Everything you touch
Yawns aren't the only things you can "catch" from the people around you.
Several weeks ago, some friends we hadn't seen in a long time arrived for a much-anticipated dinner. The husband, unbeknownst
As the recent global financial crisis taught us, privatizing gains while socializing losses is a dangerous economic policy and financial contagion cannot be easily quantified or reversed.
For those of us who were spared by fate and vaccine, Philip Roth's Nemesis charts polio's course and brings to mind the friends and neighbors who suffered the withering and the life-long incarceration of limbs.
To escape present-day harsh realities, one might do well to turn to literary portrayals in which lives are elevated. In Year of Wonders, the lives of those who care for the afflicted, and comfort the dying, are elevated.
Can a novel's depictions of healthcare workers in a plague-ravaged land inform our thinking about the lives of those who try to save lives?
Did the Democrats lose the Senate over Ebola? Pundits are parsing the exit polls, and they'll no doubt come to contradictory conclusions. But the surreal notion that President Obama's incompetence put America at risk for dread disease fed Republican efforts to cast Democrats as a danger to the nation.
That Ebola now compels other Americans to consider the threat of a contagious virus suggests how fortunate they have been. Instead of sounding off an alarm of hysteria, they might just want to listen to how the other half lives.
The immediate task before us is the containment of the Ebola outbreak. For the moment, little else matters. But we still must confront the larger challenge. We must make the repair of public health systems in developing countries a global priority.
Two potent forces power the Ebola and ISIS epidemics that the media are ignoring. They're (1) breakdown of governing authority, and (2) dissolution of "social capital" -- ties of trust and cooperation that empower individuals, families, and others to forge coalitions and tackle common problems at the community level.
Emergency funds are supposed to avoid earmarks and compartmentalization, and to provide a ready pool of money for pandemics
Of course, not everyone in Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone -- the centers of the ebola outbreak -- is impoverished and undernourished
When you're around your positive friend you connect and relate to him or her. When you're around the miserable boss, you're tense because you're picking up on his tension, maybe even trying to understand him, and it doesn't make you feel good.
When I would complain about some trivial disappointment as a child (or even a teen -- and, really, disappointments at that age never feel as trivial as they are), my mother would say, "Well, it's not the end of the world." Fortunately, she didn't live to see contemporary pop culture.
Ahhh yes, the zombie apocalypse -- that moment when the dead rise and, by biting the living, turn them into zombies as well. Some theorize that Patient Zero was Ronald Reagan.
The world is ever smaller. Flu strains incubating in China can be in New York or LA or DC in the span of a day. This is a world in which an incurable bacterial disease, spread by a tiny insect native to Asia, decimates the citrus crop in Florida.
The Tunisian Harlem Shake incident comes on the verge of an unprecedented political crisis in this country.