contemporary dance

Madboots Dance bills its performances as “personal excavations.”
Photo by Oliver Bokelberg This contemporary dance production includes graffiti and art by muralist John Valadez. During the
Wanting to spend more time arting and less time managing, I decided to become a filmmaker. (And found that film had absolutely
There are large numbers of female actors, dancers, musicians, arts managers, producers and creatives on the whole. But, in big decision making roles, prize winning works, names hitting the largest stages and recognition, more often than not the winners are men.
A large part of that energy, as I found out, is because the movement is mostly improvised, which in turn is a large part
The 70-minute piece opens with the nine-member ensemble confined to a small square patch of stage illuminated by Lucy Carter. They rise and sink and appear to shed their skins in the eerie light, like bathers in the holy Ganges, to the elegiac sounds of a synthesized church organ from A Winged Victory for the Sullen.
The performance includes a mix of shadow theater, dance and circus.
What begins as a satisfying exercise on unison dancing degrades into an embodiment of the human experience through a series of long vignettes incorporating two simple stools and, near the end, a gray table sitting cockeyed upstage for the duration of the work.
Postmodern dance often values movement for movement's sake rather than movement as a vehicle for storytelling. One gets the sense that the audience happens upon these events by accident. The scene existed before the audience arrived and will continue long after they are gone.
I've come to accept the fact that culturally we are stuck with the Kardashians, Duck Dynasty and, yes, America's Newest Weatherman. However, it doesn't mean we should forget or ignore our rich history and the people who have made significant contributions to society.
But while Baff's physical imprint on the property has been huge, it's her realized vision of Jacob's Pillow as a breeding ground for art that has made the largest impact on dance.
It's no use trying to guess what Charles Slender-White will come up with next. Since its founding in 2008, his agile contemporary dance troupe, FACT/SF, has defied pigeon-holing.
The music stopped. Hearts stopped. Holt paused but didn't stop because he had to bow and prove that it was only a performance, that he would wake up tomorrow and rehearse the same solo for his next gig. But really that's a lie, because it wasn't only a performance.
You don't have to peel too many layers to get to the dark heart of Smashed, but the astonishing deftness with which this troupe of nine keep apples and crockery flying through the air kept the audience in stitches.
Millions of Americans tuned in for the Grammys, and many were dazzled, amazed, and touched by the emotionally-charged, nude leotard clad performance of Sia's Chandelier by Kristen Wiig and Maddie Ziegler.
Dance Theatre of San Francisco is the new kid on the block -- a precocious kid on a block crammed with nimble little dance companies that turn out adventurous new work on a shoestring. Like many precocious kids, it manifests admirable talent but also exhibits immaturity.
I had the privilege recently to attend a dance festival a bit different from the norm -- not one produced by an established organization, or part of a regional effort, or one of the well known dance festivals found in nearby New York City