contemporary fiction

What are these writers despairing or gloating over? Word count. Some authors--particularly those high-stepping their way
Sometimes we need to sit with fake lives in order to contend with our real ones.
I have been a professional journalist and writer my entire adult life, but self-doubt is very real when you're stepping out of your comfort zone and writing 85,000 words of fiction versus an 800-word essay.
After researching various avant-garde agrarian adventures such as black truffle cultivation and saffron, I chanced upon a property with an existing black truffle orchard in the tiny town of Moravian Falls, which is located in Wilkes County.
Will the cover be "me?" More importantly, will it honestly represent the emotions and story I've put on the page and attract readers?
Dan Chaon was recently taken to task in Salon for suggesting that young writers read literary fiction. Why? Because it's "terrible." But Chaon wasn't recommending that young writers read only literary fiction. His advice was actually more specific than that.
Seeing the world through the eyes of another is truly one of the most seductive aspects of writing -- and reading -- fiction.
Michael Lowenthal's fourth novel, The Paternity Test, is a beautifully told story that brings myriad social issues to the forefront, and also manages to be a literary page-turner.
I spoke with award-winning author and University of Alabama professor about her inspiration for the wild storyline, her attention to language and why the suffering of the body makes for good fiction.
Tarzan, it seems, has really never gone out of style. But not many movies or even books showcased his sultry blond love interest, Jane, to the fullest extent. But that's all changed with the recently published Jane: The Woman Who Loved Tarzan by Robin Maxwell.
n 1941, as Panzer divisions closed in on Moscow, as Virginia Woolf slipped stones into her pockets and disappeared into the
Almost all literary fiction is science fiction, a thought experiment as to what life might be like if we weren't so absorbed in our iPhones but instead watched and listened to the world around us at a moment's rest.
As of December 7, short stories by Christopher Buckley, Edna O'Brien (and by January Curtis Sittenfeld, and presumably many others) are available on Kindle, courtesy of a deal with the Atlantic Monthly.
"How Far is the Ocean from Here," by Amy Shearn has to be the weirdest, funniest saddest road novel I've ever read. A single 20-something agrees to surrogate for a pair of cozy yuppies.