Convention on the Rights of the Child

More than 19,000 kids have been lured into combat since the civil war erupted.
China's treatment of refugees makes a mockery of its commitments to the international community.
We have the tools and resources to protect children better, but we have failed to do so.
Please bare with me a bit, English is not my strong suit. I wanted to write when I heard American television was airing segments
There's growing evidence that Mexico is violating the rights of migrants and preventing children from seeking asylum and other forms of protection. Mexico is increasingly detaining and deporting children, in violation of its domestic law and obligations under international human rights law. The U.S. is actively supporting these policies.
Twenty-six years ago this week, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child, a landmark global treaty establishing binding commitments to uphold children's health, education, and equal opportunities.
If we compare Black child well-being in America to child well-being in other nations, the U.S. Black infant mortality rate exceeds that in 65 nations including Cuba, Malaysia, and Ukraine. Our incidence of low-birth weight Black infants is higher than in 127 other nations.
Treaty ratification requires support from two-thirds of the U.S. Senate―a level of support that has been lacking thanks to Republican Party opposition and, especially, the fierce hostility of the conservative Republican base, including groups like the Christian Coalition, the Family Research Council, Focus on the Family, and the John Birch Society.
On September 21, 2014, we sent a public records request to the Louisiana Department of Education, requesting the number of school corporal punishment incidents for the 2011-2014 school years. On October 29, 2014, we received the data. It was revealing.
New York in November. The zombie masks and ghoulish cut-outs that flooded stores from Bloomingdale's to Battery Park have been displaced by cartoon pilgrims, turkey decals and a seasonal carol or two.
Pop quiz: Will secondary school be free for your children? Do all girls and boys have access to health care? Are children and youth protected from hazardous labor? Are there any exceptions to these rules? Are you sure?
Anniversaries provide important milestones for taking stock, and on this one, it's clear that there is still much work to be done - that in many places around the world, the promises have turned out to be empty ones. At least, so far.
While no human rights treaty is more widely ratified than the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and while governments are required to report on their compliance on children's rights once every five years, little is done in practice to end the violation of children's rights. It is time for an International Children's Court.
Between today and this time next year, around 15 million girls under the age of 18 will be married -- joining the ranks of another 700 million former child brides around the world, including 250 million who were married before the age of 15.
In countries around the world, kids work in gold mines, salt mines, and stone quarries--while millions more toil in fields, factories, or construction sites.
In Mexico, one out of every two teenagers won't finish high school. In India, only a third of students get their high school diploma. Even in the U.S., around 5500 high schoolers will drop out before the end of the day.
As we celebrate digital citizenship week, there will be a lot of discussion about good online behavior, including treating others with respect. And that's certainly a very important part of what it means to be a good citizen, whether "digital" or otherwise.
As a mischievous child, being beaten up by parents and relatives for various misdemeanors became normal. I simply thought nothing of it; I did not think there was anything wrong with it.
One day in high school, somebody from Global Kids came to recruit people for a program called the Virtual Video Project. He said we could get a stipend, and we could work in the virtual world.