conventional farming

Here's how organic food compares to conventional alternatives.
While listening to discussion of this issue on the radio, I heard an interview with a Native American woman who said that
There's no need to make this transformation a conflict of cultures, when it's really about safe and healthy food for everyone -- no matter your location, your religion, your intellectual proclivities, or your taste in farm show fashions.
In a country where over 60 percent of farmers are aged 55 or older, Farmland profiles six young farmers, portraying them as hardworking people attempting to navigate an industry fraught with risks, changing technologies and unknowns.
Industrial agriculture has been pushing small family farms out of business in a consistent way for the past 50 years. According
Our discussions raised critical questions: How do conventional and organic farming and manufacturing processes impact food quality? What toxins are present in raw and processed products? How does milling and cooking alter nutrient composition?
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has hundreds of scientists and dozens of laboratories devoted to serving large farmers. The country's 65 public agricultural universities do the bidding of large farmers.
There's a revolution brewing on the plains of Kansas. For the past 30 years Wes Jackson, founder of The Land Institute, has been working to correct a major step in the wrong direction by the founding fathers of farming -- when they chose annual grain crops instead of perennials.
First Stop? The Rodale experimental farm in Kutztown, PA. They are celebrating their 30-year study comparing the difference between organic and conventional crop yields and the impact on soil conditions.
The most pressing change must be achieved on the policy level. That change can be found in the 2012 Farm Bill, the federal