cordoba

In the aftermath of the atrocities in Paris and Brussels, and the daily outrages against humanity in Syria, Iraq and elsewhere, it is easy to forget the religious tolerance is under siege from a tiny minority of extremists.
In terms of travel photography this is one "cameo or chocolate box" village scenes © Michelle Chaplow This is the picture
Andalusia at its height shows us clearly that associating a group like ISIS with Islam and calling its leader a "caliph" is a travesty. And there is no lesson greater for everyone than to recall that there was a time, however brief, when people of different cultures and faiths lived together, worked together and prospered together.
This anonymous little store will endure as the truest testament of what was there and all that was lost. It stands as the purest expression of memory possible: A memory encased in continuing function at the service of architecture and its modern demands.
Spain's long, sandy Atlantic beaches and cozy Mediterranean coves are rightly famous throughout Europe. That most get over 300 days of sun a year doesn't hurt either.
Come for the priceless works of art, stay for the Cadillac in the patio and giant eggs on the roof. (Photo by May Lopez) See
In searching outside the realm of his own cultural tradition for wisdom, Maimonides showed us how we can build on our commonalities through a process of mixing. His life is proof that people of various backgrounds can break down walls which divide us upon our differences.
Probing the history of Al Andalus is a reminder that myths have powerful holds on cultures and identities, both good and bad.
After spending delightful few days in Seville, my friend, Clay, and I made our way to Cordoba.
2011-07-03-Screenshot20110703at7.21.58PM.jpg Self-described as "Jerusalem West," the 2,000-year-old city of Toledo in central Spain at one time had the country's largest concentration of Jews.
Armed forces are accused of murdering 2,547 civilians and presenting them as combat kills; there are now 27,000 forced disappearances in Colombia
The next day, Tapias' wife and 16 other families fled. In three months, El Palmar had lost a quarter of its population. "This
For years we've honored the victims of the Holocaust by promising never to forget. In the contemporary plight of Europe's Roma population, we have the opportunity to get make good on our promises.
For many centuries, Córdoba was a marker of Jewish creativity and cosmopolitanism afforded by Islam in contrast to the prison that was Christian Europe. "Arab Derangement Syndrome" sees things in quite the opposite way.
A Spanish man calmly drank beer with his mates in a bar with his murdered girlfriend's head in a bag, press reports said
It's time to put this debate back on course and recognize that hate-filled rhetoric hurts nobody but us. It does nothing but weaken our position as an international example in the fight to defend the rights of all people.
Cordoba blossomed after 750. At this time, most Europeans lived savagely, grunting and dragging women around by the hair, in awe of the crumbling buildings of the ancients.
Conservatives keep asking: Where are the moderate Muslims? I want to know: where are the moderate Americans? Where are the politicians who will finally stand up to this right-wing extremism?
Gary Berntsen, the tough-as-nails former CIA operative running to unseat Senator Chuck Schumer in New York, tells me al Qaeda and its affiliates are set to infiltrate the mosque before it has been built.
Naturally, Chuck Schumer has no comment on the Cordoba House. But I'm intrigued with Anthony Weiner who, in July, married a devout Muslim woman who has kept her Islamic faith.