corporate crime

"Trying to hold companies to standards that our current administration is not living up to was creating a cognitive dissonance that I could not overcome."
Even if corporations are improperly designated too big to fail or be prosecuted, that is no excuse for not prosecuting those directly responsible for their crimes. They are protected and rewarded for their criminal acts. Nobody is that big!
How do these trillions of dollars of inert money accumulate? From conniving management that doesn't know how -- or want -- to deploy it to increase the value of the company and its stakeholders.
Criminal justice reform is one of the few legislative issues that could move forward in this highly partisan election year. But this long-awaited reform is in serious danger because of efforts by big corporations and their allies to include a "get-out-of-jail-free" card for white collar offenders.
With DOJ's continued failure to bring criminal charges against any executives involved in the financial crisis, many are questioning whether it is just business as usual in Washington and the C-suite.
A sticking point has emerged, involving the Koch brothers and white-collar crime.
The government has vowed to punish executives for corporate wrongdoing. Will it follow through?
4. There is a complex legal history (beyond the scope of this brief comment) concerning the degree of cooperation shown by