corporate interests

Virtually every day there has been a new, extraordinary grant of power to corporate interests.
Her remark is an apt credo for a party leadership that has spent the last quarter-century serving corporate power as persistently as it spews out empty rhetoric about "the needs of working families."
Decisions in favor of groups like the American Petroleum Institute and the Chamber of Commerce by judges who attended seminars sponsored by the same institutions have led to the perception that corporations and conservative groups can buy judicial influence.
For Perkins, "corporatocracy" refers to the recognition that governments, including our own, are controlled by corporate interests. The motto of these corporations, globally, is to maximize profits by any means necessary.
2012-08-28-scblog2.png Though the policies advocated by Republicans and Democrats are diametrically opposed on the surface, their implications and their constituencies may be much more similar.
Watching Obama's address, I was struck by his failure to strike at the heart of what's wrong -- the enormous sums of money that special interests, particularly big corporations, have invested to buy our elections and the power that goes with them.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, front outfit for a consortium of corporations, has bragged on its website about outspending everyone in Washington, which is easy to do when Chevron, Goldman Sachs, and News Corp are writing you seven-figure checks.
Our politicians are bought. The Democrats are bought and the Republicans even more so. Everyone knows it. There is one answer though. It is the one thing that is above Congress and the Supreme Court.
I'm excited by the new venture: as long as HuffPost and AOL's shared vision imagines creative contrarian content, this site will flourish. But that will depend as much on the community as it does the leadership.
The resistance to reforming our nation's healthcare system has been fueled by entrenched corporate interests. Their deep