Cost of War

In spite of the impressive achievements tuition-free public higher education and other programs like it, Secretary Clinton and the Democrats affiliated with her campaign continue to subvert the political conversation by characterizing tax revenues spent on ordinary Americans as "free," denigrating these programs as some sort of hand-out.
While only 1 in 5 Americans claim to trust the government to do what is right, the majority of the people are not quite ready to ditch the American experiment in liberty. Or at least they're not quite ready to ditch the government with which they have been saddled.
I do not believe in war, but neither do I believe we are done with it. What I know for certain is that no future conflict should be started by leaders who do not have the courage to be honest about why it is necessary and to engage the entire nation in the effort.
If there's one thing we should have learned over the past 13 years of war, it's that war is good business for those in the business of war. Unfortunately, while profits for the Pentagon's contractors increase, so does the cost to taxpayers in billions in waste, fraud, and abuse. As America embarks on yet another war in the Middle East, Congress needs to act now to stop this unjustified bonanza for the Pentagon's contractors. The most recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan offer an ominous example about what can happen when the rush to war is met with sharp spending increases coupled with little to no oversight or fiscal restraint.
Adams originally calculated the costs of campaign against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, to be $10 billion
"We do not have a formal budget number to provide at this stage," said Caitlin Hayden, an administration spokeswoman, on
Veterans' groups have sought to focus attention on the problem. Last month, the IAVA sent 31 representatives to meet with
Sometimes Senator Bernie Sanders does something that reminds us that it does actually matter that he's an Independent in the best sense of the word: thinking for himself, not accepting the D.C. "conventional wisdom" that often defines the limits of reform. Now, Bernie's done it again.
When all is said and done, when the chain reaction of events from an American strike on Syria has played out, how many more innocent men, women and children will have been killed or injured physically and psychologically? Alternatively, it is fair to ask how many will have been spared?
Military members and families are not cultural aberrants looking for a cold niche in which to hide. We are not cold timid souls whose lack of emotion leads us to a military life scrubbed of feeling. The experiences of our lives, much like yours, are inextricably tied to our emotions.
Humility is an act of strength, not a sign of weakness, because it reflects confidence in the future more than a fear enslaved by the past. Isn't that, after all, what America should be most about? And if humility was good enough for Jesus, as the Pope is helping us to remember, then shouldn't it also be good enough for us?
If history is any judge, the U.S. government will be paying for the Iraq and Afghanistan wars for the next century as service members and their families grapple with the sacrifices of combat. An Associated Press analysis of federal payment records found that the government is still making monthly payments to relatives of Civil War veterans – 148 years after the conflict ended.
We owe it to the countless veterans, families, and Americans who have been touched by our wars to be honest with each other about the true costs of war before we send our best and brightest off to war again.
Whether as an active duty soldier in a distant land or as an educated citizen here at home, each of us has a vital role to play in ensuring our collective security.
I teach at a middle school on a military installation. This is my second time teaching at this school; my first was just over 10 years ago, before all the deployments.
Every year's glories, catastrophes, triumphs and defeats are added to the long march of history; no year stands alone. One of the common ways to sum up a year is numerically.
The failure of the Iraq war is the failure of all wars, past and future: national policy grounded in the dehumanization of a people. Iraq Syndrome may be our best hope in thwarting the power of the war consensus.
All American troops will come home from Iraq in time for Christmas this year with their heads held high, President Obama told the nation as he announced the end of American presence in Iraq. The troops are the only ones who have earned the right to hold their heads high on this momentous occasion.
We don't want to commemorate an 11th anniversary in Afghanistan. For both moral and fiscal reasons, the U.S. must change course and set a clear exit strategy to ensure we bring our troops home.