courtesy

These instructions from vintage etiquette manuals still ring true—because courtesy never goes out of style.
To the Right, Except to Pass. Like any traffic way, if you want to take your time, stick to the far right-hand side of the
In its recent survey of attitudes of government performance, the Pew Research Center posed a question to a wide swath of Americans: What is the secret of America's success as a nation?
One could be excused for believing the world is upside down at the moment. On the campaign stump, Donald Trump is now invoking the name of George Washington to defend protectionist designs underpinned by crude anti-immigrant slurs.
To the surprise (and disappointment) of many other travelers, we have flown with our infant since she was eight weeks old. At 22 months, she has flown more than 100,000 miles to 15 countries on four continents -- some of them several times -- and (I will get hate mail for this) often in first and business class.
4. RSVPing to events. Since when was "maybe" an appropriate response? 8. Giving your undivided attention to your company
Grandparents have the sweetest gig. They just get to spoil their grandchildren, right? Well, grandparents in the 21st century also have a completely different perspective on grandchildren than those of previous generations. Many think that kids are losing their ability to communicate with and respect their elders.
Maybe New Yorkers have gotten a bad rap. In fact, the folks in my building, not 40 stories, but a more humane 10, are pretty friendly. In the hallway or elevator, neighbors say, "Good morning," or "Have a good day."
Being a grown-up -- rather than a toddler -- means recognizing that world doesn't revolve around you. All your needs won't always be met. The needs of others matter too. And if your needs are in conflict? You communicate.
We often think of love as an emotion we experience, an emotion characterized by the desire to be close to another person, the sense of cozy pleasure we feel in a relationship.
When we walk up to introduce ourselves to strangers, we intuitively follow basic cultural rules of politeness. On email, though, it's the Wild West.
This phenomenon isn't unique to New York, of course. But with so many more people crammed into so much less space, I decided to meditate on the lives I sampled -- and to renew a few promises to myself.
you're upset that you're not receiving a text in return to the one you sent and you wind up sitting there for a long time wondering if the person you were texting with forgot you. They did.
When "Casual Fridays" took hold in the early nineties with the rise of the tech bubble, Americans, turned the formality dial down from power suits, to business casual, to questionably casual, to downright slovenly, and have left it there ever since.
Because despite how obnoxious and out of control and rude and selfish my toddler often is, he's often more polite than most adults I encounter, including Yours Truly. At least my toddler has an excuse for those times that he behaves badly: He's a toddler. What's ours?
Are we seeing courtesy and conversation fall victim to technology?
To have good manners is to consider the emotional well-being of someone besides yourself, which is why I have often emphasized the importance of saying "thank you" to anyone who has done something for you. But is it possible to thank someone too much?