creation care

God is the Ground and Source of our being, and at the end of each creative work, God said, "That's good." Striking against the ancient view that order is achieved through violence and domination, the God of the Hebrews creates and orders the cosmos simply and powerfully by his word.
Climate Caretakers -- whose founding members include Houghton College, the Lausanne Creation Care Network, Micah Challenge U.S.A., and Sojourners -- characterizes itself as a "campaign aimed at mobilizing Christians to prayer and action on climate change," according to Brian Webb.
Mark your calendar for September 1.
Call it the collision of two choirs. One lobs paranoid epithets from a grim cloister and hogs the microphone; the other - in which I recently bathed in a week-long conference featuring evangelical academics, scientists, and ecological activists at Gordon College in Massachusetts - sings with gentle conviction and grace. It's soothing.
Francis, a boxer in his youth, pulls no punches: "Doomsday predictions can no longer be met with irony or disdain. We may well be leaving to coming generations debris, desolation and filth."
There's a new term being bandied about, and it's high time we paid heed: integral ecology. Whenever the same notion arises synchronously in a number of different contexts -- in this case the Catholic Church, the Occupy movement, the climate movement, and the new-economy movement -- it's an idea whose time has arrived.
Evangelicals are addressing myriad threats to life, from poverty and slavery to genocide. If the life movement can devote itself to fighting these, can't it also confront the threat to our life-giving water -- and compel the small- and large-scale actions that will conserve it for human beings today and tomorrow?
Climate scientists have assumed that the overwhelming weight of evidence would carry the day. It hasn't. Indeed, studies show that, when individuals are challenged with facts contrary to their core beliefs, those beliefs temporarily harden.
We've seen these animals in zoos before, but we now had the opportunity to see them roam freely in their natural habitat. For a bunch of city kids like us, it was truly amazing.
Walking for Water in California: The State of California is facing one of the worst droughts on record. Kate Bunney will
The first stage in planting doubt is to deny the evidence. When the evidence can no longer be denied, the second stage kicks in with its disingenuous claim: "The science isn't settled." This most cynical trick of disinformers exploits a germ of truth that strikes at the heart of all science.
It is time to recognize the wrongdoing at the heart of ornamental non-native landscaping and to make amends. It is time for people to extend the love and respect they show for one another to the land that surrounds their homes and places of worship.
Global warming could cause massive social and societal disruption that easily can create more crime and burden criminal justice systems. There is a direct correlation between rising temperatures and rising violence. Our children's children will want to know why we were so selfish and short-sighted; why did we not listen to the biblical ethic of stewardship? This is certainly a matter of science, but until it also becomes an issue of faith, we will not have the social movement that we need to change our whole way of fueling our lives. Reducing and ultimately eliminating dirty energy, investing our future in clean energy, and becoming seriously committed to saving energy are such big and fundamental tasks that they will require the imperatives of faith and the leadership of the faith community.
We need deeper, more honest conversations if we are going to mobilize Americans toward an environmental ethos. "Noah" will not make a believer out of an environmentalist, or an environmentalist out of a believer.
Hell is normally depicted as a "lake of fire," as in Revelation 20:10. This week in the Midwest, however, Hell is likely to look more like lakes of ice, as dangerous cold from a polar vortex.
To restore the planet we need a spiritual worldview, which brings frugality and simplicity, humility and respect. We must be aware of the impact of our actions on all of creation.
A recovering productivity junkie, I've only begun learning how to slow down my pace long enough to rest on the Sabbath. But time is sacred. So, for at least one day a week, I try to bask in the peace that God promises.
A new sense of appreciation in humbled relationship with nature can spread like wildfire, and help us build an ecological foundation for life and prosperity, hundreds, even thousands of years into the future.