creationism evolution debate

You have heard Creationists and their sympathizers evoke the comment that you cannot assemble life from randomness. What you don't know is that this is an intentional misunderstanding of science that, unfortunately, works to sway millions of people.
A homeschooling mom's video recently went viral and offers insight into the minds of people outraged at the idea of science museums. An audit implies a power relationship, and Fox had come to the Field Museum on a mission to put those scientists in their place.
How could an educated citizen of the 21st century ever reach the conclusion that a saber-toothed cat or Tyrannosaurus rex preferred eating fruit over flesh?
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Here is the deal: If the earth is 6,000 years old (however implausible) or 4-plus billion years old (as present knowledge
If you tuned in to the Ken Ham vs. Bill Nye creationism vs. science debate, you may well have found yourself thinking, 'This guy just doesn't get it.' And, regardless of which side you're on or which guy you were referring to, you were probably right.
According to a Gallup survey from June 2012, 46 percent of Americans believed in creationism, while 32 percent believed that
Many, including members of the Baha'i Faith, look forward to a future when science and religion -- and faith and reason -- are reconciled and no longer opposed.
No matter what side of the creation-evolution debate you are on, your partisanship costs you dearly. Why? Because it costs you the ability to read the Bible on its own terms. What do we lose by straightjacketing the Bible with the creation-evolution debate?
In this case I'll feel some hurt either way because I ideologically straddle this particular event. I am a Christian, and