credit rating agencies

He wants to end a conflict of interest in how debt is rated.
The presidential hopeful says the industry has a major conflict of interest. He's not wrong.
(to be continued). Credit products are sold as fantasies of power, comfort, and freedom. Owning a home has become the most
New York City has more outstanding debt than ever before, and Mayor Bill de Blasio has proposed a 10-year capital plan that will increase it substantially. Now is the time to consider how much debt is appropriate.
Around 43 million Americans have past due medical debts on their credit reports, according to a December 2014 report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).
If your credit report has mistaken, don't become just another statistic and don't stop fighting. Here are four unconventional tactics you can use to stick it to the credit man and get the results you want.
In a recent editorial, the Wall Street Journal wrote a disastrous economic prescription for Illinois, one that calls for a "big bang" of the sort that has blown up Kansas' budget and turned that state into a poster child for reckless and short-sighted financial management.
The indications we've been given -- although no one is willing to state definitively what the final rule is likely to include -- suggest that we shouldn't get our hopes up that our chief concerns will be comprehensively or even meaningfully addressed. We hope we are reading those indications wrong.
The nation's for-profit credit reporting companies, which developed credit reports as a tool for lenders, have sought new markets for their product and aggressively marketed them to employers -- evidence be damned.
Puerto Rico's economy has been contracting since 2006 and the commonwealth's government has been borrowing to pay bills. Its