crying at work

"Yes, in that specific study the male therapists cried somewhat more than their female counterparts," Vingerhoets told The
Nanette Lepore, fashion designer When you are in control of your emotions, you are communicating that you are in control
Because this is an advice article, I am not just going to tell you not to do it. If you could stop yourself then you wouldn't be reading this. I will tell you that prevention is the key.
In my own experience, both professionally and personally, crying is one of the body's ways to bring itself back to balance. It is not necessarily a sign of weakness or even sadness. Infants cry to communicate with their universe. New mothers cry... a lot. And so do the rest of us.
Now, as uncomfortable as you might be, the first and most important consideration when you’re staring into the welling eyes
Whether you're hitting happy hour with your boss or bawling your eyes out in the stairwell, time at the office isn't always the marathon of productivity and engaging meetings we might expect.
When health-care providers cry -- as they almost all do, at least occasionally -- I encourage all of us as their family members, friends, colleagues, and sometimes patients to offer them an ear, a tissue, and a reminder that even though it is rarely talked about, they are not crying alone.
What do we travel for if not this -- to be lifted out of our ingrained identities and to experience our humanity?
Sandberg's point that we should (somewhat) blur the lines between our "professional selves" and our "authentic selves" seems relevant to Americans in a whole variety of fields.