cultural revolution

Liberals must develop a more effective means of engaging their staunchest critics.
For decades many Westerners were confident that revolutions could transform lagging Third World countries into fledgling
It's always exciting to visit the PRC. But it is most interesting to learn about China, which is vastly larger, more complex, and humane than the nominal communist state which still rules. It's impossible to predict what China will ultimately become. Most important is that it becomes free, consigning today's authoritarian regime to history's dustbin. Then the people of China will be able to decide their own future.
I awoke to news of Prince's death that Friday morning (still Thursday in the U.S.) in a hotel room about as far from Minneapolis as you can be. I reacted with a combination of sorrow and homesickness, tempered by words of mourning that I shared with friends.
Wei remembers clearly the first time she tried a mango. She was six years old, from Dalian in north-east China, and just as she bit into the fruit her parents told her that it was the deceased leader Chairman Mao.
Over 1.7 million people died during the 10-year Cultural Revolution, which effectively began on May 16, 1966.
Perhaps no government policy anywhere in the world affected more people in a more intimate and brutal way than China’s one
The internet has always been a ruthless place. But recent episodes of political cyberbullying (in some cases driving people to suicide) have left me pondering: Does history always repeat itself?
China has come far. But it has even further to go. Where it ends up is likely to depend on whether the government comes to trust its people and becomes accountable to them. If not, the 21st Century is unlikely to end up as the Chinese Century.