culture wars

I had an epiphany and I hope we all get this now before we get played again.
History abounds with examples of tyrants exploiting groups of people who believed they were about to be saved from the uncertainties of life, and the rule of divide and conquer has been a favorite tool.
Amidst the speed of changes occurring in both nature and culture it takes very little to tear the skin of civilization and reveal massive and festering emotional wounds full of fear, rage, resentment and vengeance.
Looking at social issues over the past 100 years -- gay marriage, universal health care, public education, the legalization of marijuana, etc. -- it is clear to see that conservatives are consistently on the wrong side of history, selfishly encumbering societal progress.
What progressive wouldn't relish the thought of Donald Trump as the Republican nominee? But there should be no sugarcoating the long-term dangers that an irreligious Republican party presents.
Justice Scalia was the proud possessor of a rigorously textual sense of legal reasoning and a decidedly oversized judicial personality. He was known, by friend and foe alike, as the promoter of a novel approach to judicial decision-making known as originalism.
After 88 years, isn't it fair to expect that a societal shift should have already occurred that would result in better representation of the diverse American family in an industry that is inherent to America? Please, Oscar, do the right thing, already!
In the modern world a "myth" is seen as something untrue that people believe in error or out of foolishness. Yet, genuine myths are stories that appear false on the outside; but reveal truths on the inside, when seen in a deeper way.
I hope to explore the self-understanding I have gradually and painfully accumulated over the years, and what this has meant
America's culture wars have raged in nearly every imaginable setting, from courtrooms, to CEO boardrooms, to hospital rooms and even classrooms. But who could have possibly foretold that the battle's next frontier would be fought on the Starbucks line?
Since having sex is neither random nor (typically) undesirable, nor are the costs of contraception that significant, it cannot be "insured."
By turning Christmas into a battle over ideology and marketing, we -- not Starbucks or Target or anybody else -- strip this holiest of days of the very significance we're claiming to defend.
One does not have to be a Mormon Elder, a Mormon, a believer, to find reason to listen. Nor would Oaks expect everyone to agree with his every line. He is starting a conversation, which is the most subversive thing to do among people who want to prosecute a culture war over religion.
Cynics, but not only cynics, like to observe, not always inaccurately, that Christians are never happy unless they are fighting -- each other. Certainly, their scriptures have notes of militancy. Most of these signal fighting -- evils at a distance or evils within the self.
ROME -- Understanding the culture and history of a host country enables one to be accepted and heard there. Thus, Pope Francis could raise as gently as possible some of the most debated issues in the U.S. while still ending his speech in Congress with a standing ovation.
The Pope is expressing a gracious and loving attitude toward the world, not the militant condemnation and separatism conveyed by some conservative evangelicals. He is moving toward the people, not away from them.
But Davis is no hero either. She is an embarrassment to the church, and it is a shame that more of my sisters and brothers
I didn't think about it. I never had to think about it, having never carried an unwanted pregnancy. For me, the pro-Life movement was simple, uncomplicated, pretty and sanitized as a small silver ornament.
When young people have angsted at me about the gay debate, I've just told them to follow Jesus--to seek to honor Him with their sexuality and love others well.
Recently, New York Times columnist David Brooks lamented that conservative Christians are losing the culture war. Brooks suggested that conservative Christians shift focus and "nurture stable families." But Brooks is wrong; the culture war isn't over. Conservatives are stuck in a war they can't win.