curse words

While the use of the F-word in books, movies and other media is now as common as oxygen, I recently read that it is now making
“Profanity is often used to express one’s unfiltered feelings ... and sincerity,” a study says.
Linguist Benjamin K. Bergen talks about when – and why – we use profanity.
My parents moved us to Utah when I was ten, and there I became so used to the Mormon habit of not swearing that even into my twenties when I was in graduate school, I struggled with books and movies that I was required to watch/read for my studies that had bad language in them.
The senator said she swore a lot to fit in with the men she worked with.
7. "Oh, poop." 17. "Hell's bells" 14. "Drats!" 5. "Gosh" Whatever your curse word of choice was, it's more than likely less
I've written hundreds of thousands of words during the past 50 years, but I've never written the f-word. I don't need the word to communicate effectively or to get published. The English language is rich with so many other delightful, juicy, descriptive, and provocative words.
These are the kinds of words I want to excise from my kids' vocabularies, or at least severely limit, whether or not anyone else hears them.
To me, the vulgarity in the novel was not its language. What truly makes me cringe -- the most vulgar and obscene things in life -- are humanity's ubiquitous displays of unrelenting greed, hatred, intolerance, and the unquenchable need of people to make war.
When it comes to profanity, I lead a double life. On the job, I'm the perfect lady Mom raised me to be. But inside my own head, and in my own home, and with my close friends, I'm Lenny Bruce.
It would appear that there is a "dose" of swearing that works best. If you swear too much it reduces its benefit, but if you do not swear at all, you may not have as a high a pain tolerance. Swearing seems to have a protective effect -- to a point.
But there's a lot of Spanish words out there whose literal meaning differs considerably from its figurative meaning. For