cursing

I didn’t plan on raising my daughter with the “bad words are OK at home” rule. It just kind of happened.
"There is perhaps one word I should try to cut out of my vernacular."
While the use of the F-word in books, movies and other media is now as common as oxygen, I recently read that it is now making
We have all seen the recent headlines about mistreatment of women. Many readers are probably shocked, but for women who have gone through it, this is business as usual. As a retired lawyer who lived through physical and verbal domestic violence, I am appalled by the way the system treats women who are abused.
I've heard people say cussing is a morality issue. It's not. Our daughter is a good person. She is responsible at home. She knows swearing does not make a person bad. Being disrespectful and treating others poorly makes them bad. To us, these issues are separate.
So go ahead and let it out when necessary, but know that the pain-relieving effects of cursing decrease in people whose vocabularies
I will never get past my proper upbringing to use that word in public...to say it out loud... to let that melody of wondrous mouth watering, sexy, dangerous, swear words roll off my tongue. I will continue to lie to the world.
In his litany, Milbank unintentionally called Trump a criminal when he used the word "farbrecher." I suspect he was relying on websites that say it means "con man," but you can also find myriad websites supplying quotations that famous writers never remotely said.
Can we create a list of the seven words that we must say? Wouldn't it be just as important to teach our children those words? The positive rather than negative? Wouldn't it be amazing to see a dad stooping to teach his to child to say, "Holy love!"?
It is inevitable that they will wait for the worst time to appropriately use the inappropriate words they heard come flying out of your mouth. And of course, they will give you all the credit for their newly acquired language skills.
As a culture we have decided that certain words are more powerful than others, and in some instances we've taken it even further and decided that some words are downright bad. How can a word itself be bad?
In the social media world, we communicate briefly without full sentences and offer quick letter combos (LOL) that further discourage open dialogue with any complexity. In a world chock full of anger and anxiety, this rapid fire practice of communication could lead to widespread misinterpretations and deeply hurt feelings.
Having lived for many years in one of the most populated cities in the world, I have had the opportunity to make first impressions with countless others of the years. Oftentimes, I would wonder what first impressions am I making when I meet a stranger for the first time?
Nearly all children find it exciting to experiment with naughty words. How we handle this phase will play a large part in determining whether swearing becomes an ongoing problem or a temporary phase.