cussing

Linguist Benjamin K. Bergen talks about when – and why – we use profanity.
As a culture we have decided that certain words are more powerful than others, and in some instances we've taken it even further and decided that some words are downright bad. How can a word itself be bad?
I must admit, there have been times when I've really wanted to blurt out something foul -- on the highway, during arguments with my husband or when trying to get the cap off of a bottle of ibuprofen when I'm particularly hormonal -- and wished there was an effective alternative to blurting the F-word.
I'm not ready for Sienna to have her mom's sailor mouth, but eventually, when she's a teen, I don't want her to be afraid of speaking the language of her classmates and once she reaches adulthood, I hope to be ready for her to speak such words in my presence as part of normal conversation because the reality is that cursing is ordinary and sometimes, often even, acts as a release for pent up stress.
WTF is up with all the profanity being used these days? I get that most people have the occasional drunken sailor moment, but nowadays, I encounter profanity everywhere I turn. I admit I'm turning a lot to social media, which is doused in it.
Jeffrey Dean Morgan was feeling a bit under the weather, but he pushed through it for his appearance on "The Late Late Show
Cussing at work is not just limited to the private sector. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, a man said to have quite
TV Replay scours the vast television landscape to find the most interesting, amusing, and, on a good day, amazing moments
It stands to reason that as America grows more multilingual, we'll hear more Spanish on the airwaves. And some of that Spanish will be of the naughty variety.