dada

Photo by Oliver Bokelberg This contemporary dance production includes graffiti and art by muralist John Valadez. During the
  --Charlotte Jansen Among the works and documentation on show at the Kunsthaus, selected by in-house curator Cathérine Hug
By Raamish Saeed Last week's Supreme Court split decision on the Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals leaves already overburdened
An anti-Banksy & Co. street art show opened in Bologna, Italy, the same night as its controversial bank-backed cousin with brand new works by 50 or so Italian and international street artists and open admission to their outdoor "museum."
An exact century after the Cabaret Voltaire opened its doors in February 1916, one group performance descendant from Dada and Surrealist sensibilities this Valentine's Day was a performance art extravaganza called LUST, produced by the young New York artist-entertainer, designer and entrepreneur, Abby Hertz.
A beautiful new documentary illuminates the difference between an art collector and a patron who not only amasses a tremendous collection but whose taste and interests help define an era.
Noah Purifoy: Junk Dada at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) is the first monographic exhibition dedicated to
FAILE may be a religious experience this summer at the Brooklyn Museum, but only one of the hallowed installations is called "Temple." The seedier, more dimly lit venue will surely have the larger number of congregants by far, bless their sacred hearts.
It's disingenuous that nobody walks in LA--we have a become a stroller's paradise, with art walks abounding in every neighborhood.
Does religion exist at all in today's art world? Yes, but most often as documentary or anthropological art about religion. It's also been said that contemporary art viewing experiences are similar to traditional religious experiences.
Screens. Bright fingers that claw at our eyes. Expressions of tenderness, movements of thought, sexual fantasies, our greatest
Dieter Meier, known as the Godfather of techno pop along with collaborator Boris Blank, kept Le Poisson Rouge jumping Sunday night, though the uber polite Swiss obeyed the New York cabaret laws and didn't dance.
The show operates on several different levels. In 21st century terminology, it is a mashup of history, psychology and art.