dadaab

“I was already in the USA in my mind, and I had finally been able to get this opportunity to belong."
Kismayo, the capital of the southern-most province of Somalia, was recovered from the Al-Shabaab terrorist organization in
The activist visited the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya to speak out for girls' education rights.
It seems unfathomable that Kenya should suddenly decide to close refugee camps that have been in existence for over 25 years.
The refugee challenge for Kenya poses a knotty set of challenges, both urgent and longer term. Immediate demands continue but longer term solutions are desperately needed.
In order to genuinely win the hearts and minds of the ordinary citizens, the Somali leadership must not hasten making decisions on their behalf or self-interest by signing any treaty at a disadvantaged position with countries that have more negative record than positive.
If Dadaab were actually counted as a city, it would be Kenya's third or fourth most populous. Yet it's not counted; it doesn't exist. It's a liminal space, neither here nor there, and its inhabitants exist between worlds interminably.
Sitting down on the bus carrying us out through the stunning Darbyshire countryside to a cavern where we would watch an Opening Night film for the Sheffield Doc Fest, little did I know what the woman sitting next to me would come to represent for me.
Kenya certainly faces legitimate security concerns. And with the country's presidential campaign heating up, it is understandable that the government wants to make its city streets safer and more secure.
One of war's consequences -- and sometimes its cause -- is the destruction of natural resources.