dan snyder

Taking a knee is a meaningless gesture when co-opted by an organization named after a racist slur.
They're citing products like "Take Yo Panties Off" clothing to save their offensive trademark.
We should not let the fear of a football team regaining trademark registration justify the suppression of rights for other groups.
The moment more fans reject that paradigm and hold the league accountable will be the moment things will finally change for the better. In a more diverse and tolerant America that increasingly rejects for-profit bigotry, that moment is coming sooner rather than later.
It's been 20 years since a professional football game was played in Los Angeles. For our second-largest city, with all of its wealth, entrepreneurial spirit and energy, that's simply not acceptable. True, you have near-professional quality some years with UCLA and USC. Unfortunately, it's not quite the same.
Looking back, one could admit that he bit off more than he could possibly chew. Nonetheless, the franchise hasn't been the biggest help either.
True objectivity involves recognizing that using this racial slur in news coverage is, unto itself, an act of opinion and advocacy on behalf of those who wish to denigrate Native Americans.
As it stands, the Redskins' 1-3 start isn't even the most painful part of their 2014 season. Instead, the team has been dog-piled by bad publicity even before the season began. Embracing the story of the Hominy Indians could be the perfect solution.
Washington football team owner Dan Snyder has refused to change the team's name and has argued that it is a term of honor