Daniel Ellsberg

The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner by Daniel Ellsberg "Especially timely given the recent saber-rattling
Nuclear brinksmanship, threats of nuclear war, and similar uses of nuclear weapons to intimidate hold the potential for catastrophe.
In the great tradition of Clarence Darrow, Charles Garry, Ernest Goodman, William Kunstler, Carol Weiss King, Arthur Kinoy
We need Snowden in America - for many good reasons. For those who see him as an enemy, we have always been taught to keep our enemies close to us and there is no logic to be found in forcing him into unsavory hands far from home.
A few of us have been at this "'notable person on the spectrum writes book'-thing" for some time. And whether it's me, Temple Grandin, Liane Holliday Willey, Jerry Newport, John Elder Robison, or Donna Williams...etc. I'm going to guess that we all, as oldsters, see a tremendous number of young, next-gen spectrumites who are writing, or who are seeking to write books about what life is like on the autism spectrum.
Kim Davis certainly does not walk in the footsteps of progressive leaders who took a stand to improve circumstances for oppressed people. Rather, she follows the muddled path of such people as Alabama Governor George Wallace.
Throughout the week, we discussed the problem of pernicious governmental, corporate and other top-down secrecy involved in globalization that enables large-scale wrongdoing and keeps citizens in the dark about it, making effective solutions and real democracy, and even our collective security, impossible.
Some foes of mass surveillance have been celebrating the final passage of the USA Freedom Act, but Thomas Drake sounds decidedly glum. The new law, he tells me, is "a new spy program." It restarts some of the worst aspects of the Patriot Act.
Without whistleblowers, citizens are at the mercy of massaged truths and fine-crafted fictions spun by officials who prefer shadows to sunlight.
While Daniel Ellsberg, his compatriot and companion in revelation, remains a major figure for his role in releasing the Pentagon Papers, Tony Russo is a forgotten man. That's too bad. He shouldn't be forgotten. His is, unfortunately, a story of our times as well as his.
With its omnipresent surveillance, the U.S. government began aggressively targeting and prosecuting whistleblowers and other sources, putting renowned journalists and publishers worldwide directly or incidentally in their surveillance crosshairs.
Over the next few weeks at the United Nations the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference will be in session, and the central question is will it go down in history as another lost opportunity or the dramatic turning point that millions of people around the world are hoping for?
The trial of former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling, set to begin in mid-January, is shaping up as a major battle in the U.S. government's siege against whistleblowing.
Fred Branfman, writer and peace activist, passed away on September 24, 2014, at the age of 72 in Budapest.
Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department official who leaked the Pentagon Papers exposing the Vietnam War lies, is
The Johnson administration was looking for a pretext to escalate the war. "We don't know what happened," National Security Adviser Walter W. Rostow told the president after Congress passed the resolution, "but it had the desired result."
I had a great epiphany on the train last week which was that I'm beginning to see hacking not merely as cracking codes, or as Richard Stallman says "playful cleverness", but as man's will to deconstruct things in order to rebuild them into something better.
This is Day 2 of my journal shooting my history on computer hacking at HOPE X Conference.
The Obama administration is toying with whether to send New York Times reporter James Risen to jail for refusing to reveal a source involved in a federal leak investigation dating back to 2006.