data mining

The president's comments came amid revelations that Cambridge Analytica reportedly collected data on 50 million people through Facebook.
Suicides account for 64% of all gun-related deaths, especially among older populations of males. Making firearms easy-to
How is that even possible? It doesn't make sense. These devices come with privacy statements. There are federal laws that
The GOP senator's campaign is building off a successful tactic.
Privacy and security are not opposing forces but mutually beneficial of each other and crucially intertwined as a means of protecting and advancing us. We need to protect them both in order to truly protect ourselves.
Sophisticated digital platforms that leverage "small" pieces of information or the data contained within citizens and their localities can strengthen the quality of democracy. Taken together, the following examples illustrate the ability to combine the right data to forge 21st century digital public infrastructure.
This can extend to drug-related toxicity, too. Scientists have identified and studied patients with vincristine-induced neuropathy
We are generating more data today than ever before - and it's improving everything from healthcare and auto safety to education
Steve Jobs is back all over the media and movie screens these days - as Hollywood portrays its take of his genius and his warts. At the end of the day (not the movie), Jobs' greatest notoriety may indeed be elevating Tim Cook to be his successor.
Seemingly taking its cue from science fiction, technology has moved so fast in the short time since Minority Report premiered in 2002 that what once seemed futuristic no longer occupies the realm of science fiction.
The data we generate in our digital lives can reveal important information, particularly about our health. For one, our social networks can be predictive of health outcomes and conditions, in part because of shared attitudes amongst social groups.
Word leaked out on Friday in Brussels that The European Parliament is going to call for the break-up of Google. That must be a tough pill to swallow for Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt.
Google has it all, which is way too much. Actually, it's downright frightening just how much. Do we want to live in a society where everything we do, 24/7, is monitored by corporations like Google?
You know how it is when you get the sense the person you're talking to is nodding their head appearing to listen, but is really just waiting to talk. Desperate to interject and say the right thing, they ... don't.
Does it feel like someone is always watching you? Have you noticed the same ads showing up no matter where you go online? And they all try to sell you stuff that has very little to do with your actual interests?