David Foster Wallace

Every year around this time, I listen to some of the great commencement speeches. There’s very little that inspires me more
So what will become of dark comedies, a genre whose very best exemplars aim to betray the prevailing culture's "impoverished
Eleven years ago, the novelist delivered one of the all-time best commencement addresses. Here's the backstory.
Last summer my son turned 18 years old. I enthusiastically said to him, "Wonderful, you can vote for our next president." He answered, rather gloomily, "I feel it is pointless, they all make promises they never fulfill. How can I choose a candidate?"
David Foster Wallace spent the last years of his life teaching creative writing at Pomona College. Pomona College is no more than a 10-minute walk from where I live. It is also where David Foster Wallace chose to end his life in September 2008 at age 46.
You have written for adults and children. Why did you write this one for adults? It presented a juicy opportunity to delve
The most persistent question is whether language can adequately tell our stories. Citing various thinkers, such as David Foster Wallace, Wittgenstein and Kierkegaard -- whose lines appear in ticker tape on the screen -- the film director wonders about the cracks in our ability to shape the meaning of our world.
The actor talks Oscar buzz, playing David Foster Wallace and success.
Serena, like many successful women, is burdened with the responsibility of being both preternatural and marketable, miraculous in talent but accessible to the masses. She is asked to defy the laws of physics, put on displays of athletic ingenuity, but also comport herself like she is at the local country club.
Wallace and his work (Infinite Jest in particular) have been formative and dear to me in a way that's difficult to express without sounding disturbed. Wallace's prose is absolutely singular, combining brilliant playful formalism, gleeful trivia and an unabashed devotion to raw sincerity.
There is nothing wrong with not liking the writing of David Foster Wallace, but placing all of his many fans in a bubble of "literary chauvinism" is an unjust and narrow-minded approach to express said dislike.
The End of the Tour is focused on human connection through conversing openly, and considering that the contents of these conversations came directly from two perspicacious writers, it never ceases to fascinate and enlighten.
By 1996, upon the publication of the gargantuan novel Infinite Jest, its author David Foster Wallace was the envy of writers. Touted in exalted ways, praised as brilliant, his work produced an "anxiety of influence" for the literary.
If The End of the Tour encourages some people to dive into "Infinite Jest," so much the better. If it doesn't, I think that's OK too.
Jason Segel gives a performance of enormous compassion and sensitivity as author David Foster Wallace in The End of the Tour. The film is based on the audiotapes of a four-day marathon interview of Wallace by Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky, played by Jesse Eisenberg.