David Lowery

Director David Lowery cites the works that influenced his masterpiece.
Channing Tatum dances, Emma Stone soars and a Niffler misbehaves.
I like this film because, unlike some other recent Disney remakes, it doesn't try to be darker than the original but creates
Millions of unlicensed songs doesn't look like an understandable accident, it looks more like an unacceptable policy. And that would be a policy that is exactly what the compulsory mechanical license was designed to prevent.
A few days ago, Iowa duo Dagmar's first video, "Tumbleweed," premiered with Bitch Media and the artists are already shooting their next video, "What Do You Want," another track from their self-titled debut album.
James Lee Stanley: "Twinkle In Your Eye" is my take on Alzheimer's and on love and loyalty. It's like a three-minute version of The Notebook.
Jordan Witzigreuter: "I wrote a bunch of songs -- 70 or so -- over the past two years, and only a few of those 70 were even considered for this album. I tend to like a song when I finish it, give it a week, and then I'm over it, so the ones that made the cut were the ones I still felt passionately about."
Congress, for the first time since 1976, is reviewing and rewriting copyright law and doing so within the context of the Internet and the digital distribution of creative works. The stakes couldn't be higher for the creative community.
After several years honing his craft directing short films and editing featurs, David Lowery makes a supremely confident entree onto the feature directing stage with Ain't Them Bodies Saints.
Ain't Them Bodies Saints is meticulously constructed. With deft camerawork and a pure attention to 70s small town details, there is a fantastic, technically sound structure that director David Lowery has built.
So many films today seem to carry the same references to earlier work, indicating the influences that shaped the filmmaker in his work. But references are one thing; using those references for fresh inspiration is something else.
This commentary continues on my website. Written and directed by former editor Lance Edmands, Bluebird examines the ripple
In his royalty statement posted to The Trichordist, Lowery also highlights his songwriting fees from streaming music service
"People will refer to something culturally as "the lost coast," which is pretty much the entire coast above San Francisco and the adjacent towns... You're sort of in this land of the lost -- this lost hippie republic."
Lowery's post was itself a response to an earlier post by an NPR intern, Emily White, and was widely viewed as a game changer among musicians and music fans as well as other creators.
These are some of my memories and methods of wanting music so badly that I just reached out and grabbed it even before Napster made it easy and cool. Apparently, none of my cohort ever did any of this stuff. Either that, or they are doing that generational-amnesia thing.