davos 2016

"It’s true that robots are taking away some jobs, but at the same time they’re creating lots of new jobs," one economist says.
Neri Oxman, Sony Corporation Career Development and associate professor of Media Arts and Sciences at the MIT Media Lab, discusses how we're moving from an age of enlightenment "where domains have been siloed" to an age of entanglement.
Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, discusses how technology and artificial intelligence may be taking away jobs but they're also creating them.
Victor Halberstadt, a Dutch professor of economics at Leiden University, explains what the Netherlands has historically gotten right about cultural inclusiveness.
Gender parity is the ultimate goal, but we are not just talking about surface matters like child care and maternity leave policies. We are talking about building a corporate environment that is conducive to the equal contribution and success of both women and men.
Content can be subject to deliberate concealment: when protesters in Mexico adopted the hashtag "#YoMeCanse" to demand answers in the case of the missing students of Ayotzinapa, bots employed by pro-government entities spammed the hashtag until it was useless in the consolidation of information and the organization of activists in the field.
For much of the 20th century, Western democratic nation states and the media coexisted within a mutually beneficial information ecosystem. This largely symbiotic relationship has been radically disrupted by the concurrent rise of digital technology and the social media ecosystem that it enabled.
The effectiveness of vaccines in a population operates just like donning sunglasses in New York. A certain percentage of the population must be wearing them for celebrities to be safe from their adoring fans. In the same way, a certain percentage of the population must be vaccinated for us to be safe from adoring germs.
Last month, as I attended presentations at the World Economic Forum, I came away impressed by many of the conversations on addressing the world's overlapping economic, social, and environmental threats. But I also came away hoping for more discussion about health as central to meeting these global challenges.
Both as a person and as an organization you boundaries get stretched. You start thinking far beyond your limited perspectives
"Millennials refuse to work in these antiquated, backward systems," according to Harry West.
Harry West, CEO of frog, the global design firm, discusses the ways Apple's iPhone transformed workplace culture in a way not even Steve Jobs expected.
We are on the border of a Fourth Industrial Revolution that will fundamentally change the way we work and live in the coming decades but what exactly does it mean to Africa?
I might be naive, sleep deprived, or just caught up in the buzz of the moment, but it feel as if the tide is turning for girls and women, and as if we are moving girls and women's health, rights, and empowerment from being a non-issue, to being a non-negotiable issue.
Here's why one CEO thinks we need to "teach children, and frankly, adults, how to learn."