dc circuit court

Ever since three-judge panels on the Fourth Circuit and the D.C. Circuit issued conflicting rulings in July on the availability of tax credits under the ACA, opponents of the law have been trying to rush their case to the SCOTUS. Thanks to an Order just issued by the full D.C. Circuit, the chances of getting the case in getting there just got a lot lower.
The Washington court that will hear the case has seven judges appointed by Democratic presidents, including four by Obama
Paul Ryan is attempting to address poverty, once again. What he's really doing is trolling the media to write "compassionate conservative" columns about him (which, so far, doesn't seem to be working very well), to bolster his chances to get the Republican presidential nomination.
Volume 287 (1/17/14) If the interest of Mr. Cuomo and his team has strayed into chatter about whether the attorney general's
In fact, it was even a big week just for political anniversaries. Fifty years ago this week, an event of no little importance happened. I speak, of course, tomorrow's 50th anniversary of the first broadcast of Doctor Who by the BBC.
There's an old adage in politics that the way to win political struggles is to "bring a gun to a knife fight." If this imagery isn't violent enough for you, the subject on the table now is whether Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is considering what is called the "nuclear option."
By nominating individuals to fill seats already vacant on that court, President Obama (like President Bush before him who had four nominees confirmed to fill vacant seats on the D.C. Circuit) is merely fulfilling his constitutional duty.
Apparently, having a black, Kenyan-born Communist who is both Muslim and a radical Christian in the Oval Office changes the rules of judicial appointments. That is the only conclusion we can reach for key Republican senators have reversed their opinions 180 degrees from what they've stated in the past.
President Barack Obama said Monday that he is "deeply disappointed" in Senate Republicans for blocking three of his nominees
Pillard worked twice in the administration of President Bill Clinton — at the solicitor general's office, which handles Supreme