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Trump attacked Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen on the campaign trail.
Just like NAFTA, just like China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO), free traders swore that the Korean deal would shower jobs and economic prosperity down on America. It didn't happen. Actually, the exact opposite did.
A New York Times editorial signals that a progressive cause is going mainstream.
The emptiness of past promises stands as a stark warning of the likely emptiness of the promises now to come. We know the trade deal that America needs. If the TPP is not do that, it does not deserve our support: and if it does not deserve our support, that support should not be given.
The 2014 election was just as disastrous as 2010. Many observers now agree that Democrats again lost big because they failed to offer a clear economic message to economically insecure voters -- and they once again failed to attack Republicans for sabotaging action to create jobs.
The idea of branding climate change could seem like another exercise in navel-gazing unless you consider the effectiveness of the opposition. They've got branding down, relentlessly repeating the mantra, "science is inconclusive and solutions are exorbitant and unproven."
This week as the Senate worked to pass a bipartisan budget framework that doesn't cut Social Security or Medicare benefits; a hearing without the same fanfare took place just steps away. In a high-ceilinged, wood-paneled committee room, U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) chaired a hearing that might prove the more historical moment of the week.
A cornerstone of President Obama's plan to create more American jobs is a new agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), referred to by some as "NAFTA on steroids." On Moyers & Company, we discuss the TPP with two perceptive observers of the global economy.
Given the economy's slow rebound, is this really their plan to strengthen America? Is there any community which can afford to lose millions of dollars and hundreds of jobs over the next decade?
President Obama's proposal cutting Social Security benefits for both current and future retirees has once again become a deficit debate bargaining chip. However, as a consolation, the president promises he won't "slash" benefits. Mr. President, please define "slash."
Our caseworkers and job developers typically submit some stirring and heartwarming clients, and this year's batch was no different.
Raising the minimum wage so that it keeps up with the increases in productivity of the American worker is not a half-rate measure. Rather, it is one important tool in rebuilding the middle class.
Republicans on Capitol Hill have dug themselves into a deep and narrow chasm whose walls are about to close in. In a matter of weeks, they may find themselves squeezed mercilessly between their implacable right wing and constituents feeling the pain of sequestration.
We know that Washington insiders -- and their corporate sponsors -- will keep trying to perpetuate their self-serving mythologies. But let's stop saying that "government should act more like a business." They don't even know what that means.
It's common to cite Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security as cushioning the burdens of old age and providing access to otherwise unaffordable health care. But how often do we think of them as protecting our backs in an uncertain, risky, and rapidly changing global economy?
Work no longer pays in America. The game is fundamentally rigged and ordinary people who do everything right, who play by rules still end up with the short end of the stick.
The President will do what he thinks is best. The rest of us need to as well. If the deal goes down, it will be quite a way to start the President's second term, an ugly fight with the people who fought by his side to elect him.
Working Americans are paying the price as the parameters of the current debate around the deficit, budget and the so-called fiscal cliff are being defined by the likes of Goldman Sachs. There can be little doubt that working people are not represented in Washington.
The fact that virtually no one actually thinks reaching the fiscal cliff is a good thing when push comes to shove tells you everything you need to know about how absurd and besides the point our debates about deficit issues have been.