Dean Ornish

We have been preoccupied with anti-aging perhaps since the very dawn of self-awareness, and the implications of mortality it unveiled. We have, ever since, tethered our fears to faith and fantasy, tangled our aspirations up in fable -- about fountains of youth in particular.
We know what to eat; we simply keep refusing, across an expanse of squandered decades, to swallow it.
The truth about saturated fat is not unsettled. What is unsettled is: Can we handle the truth?
News flash: Top global physicians and academics agree -- eat more fruits and vegetables.
With the strength of unity, a signal of what we truly do know can rise above the din and discord.
Technology, for all of its wonder, can never laugh with us, cuddle us, or pass us a tissue to dry our tears.
Here is a brief but in-depth overview of the current research on soy and health. We conclude that moderate amounts of soy, primarily whole, minimally-processed or fermented soy foods are safe and can be a valuable part of a low-fat, vegetarian diet.
With increasing research, the message is becoming clear: For most people with uncomplicated heart disease, the risk of angina, arrhythmia or death is relatively low during sexual activity and comparable to the risk associated with mild to moderate physical exertion.
It's lovely when scientific studies back up what we have always known in our heart of hearts. "Kindness IS its own reward." We all have experienced the immediate benefits we receive when we offer kindness to another -- enriching feelings of connection and emotional intimacy.
It is medicine that is safe, generally inexpensive, pleasurable, stunningly powerful, and potentially accessible to all. It is suitable for children and octogenarians alike; it is safe during pregnancy. It is medicine that can do more to advance the human condition than any other.
I recently attended Arianna Huffington's event, THRIVE, and listened to both Dr. Dean Ornish and Dr. Mark Hyman discussing the significant role of diet in overall well-being. The physical cannot be separated from the mental, and in fact without it thriving is almost impossible.
For the last 37 years, Dr. Dean Ornish, M.D., Huffington Post Medical Editor and founder and president of the Preventive
We all know that eating well and exercising are key factors to living a healthy life -- but is there another way that we
We all like to eat. Most of us want to eat well; at least we try to be good some of the time. We all know that how and what we eat directly impact our health and well-being. Yet few subjects are more prone to confusion and distortion than diet and nutrition.
At the Symposium, keynote speaker and HuffPost Medical Editor Dr. Dean Ornish, author, president and founder of the Preventive
Whether about wheat or meat, sugar or starch, calories or carbohydrates, this fat or that fat, we seem to have an insatiable appetite for mere grains of truth about diet and health, rather than the complete recipe.
Does nine servings a day sound like a heavy lift? Well, consider this: If we ate just one more serving a day -- one banana or a large carrot -- we would save $5 billion annually in health care expenditures and prevent more than 30,000 heart-related deaths.
"The only way we're going to save money, improve the quality of care, improve people's lives is by focusing on prevention
Those who want today's news to be that the Mediterranean diet has been proven superior to other truly good diets will need to wait until tomorrow, or longer. We had previously lacked any good head-to-head comparisons of "best diet" candidates, and we still do.